David Rieff

is not in Sri Lanka, or even Syria or Afghanistan, but in the NGO response to the migration crisis in Greece and in the Mediterranean. For here, whether they like it or not, when they rescue people at sea who are trying to get to Europe, relief NGOs are involved not just in caritative work, whose deontology is relatively straightforward ethically; here, they are important actors in a profound political struggle, whose outcome, along with the response or non-response to climate change, is likely to define the next half century. It is a commonplace to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

In this interview, Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse, discusses search-and-rescue operations in the Mediterranean Sea, in particular those conducted by her organisation. She explains that as a European citizen movement, SOS MEDITERRANEE has adopted a hybrid and politicised approach, which represents a new kind of humanitarian engagement. And she reflects on the challenges of protecting and supporting those crossing the Mediterranean.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

identified as communicative challenges for humanitarian monitoring and evaluation in South Sudan, especially the ‘large number of national languages spoken and low literacy rates’ ( Steets et al. , 2016 : 28). Research on Greece’s migration crisis has illustrated a need for similar considerations. It has shown, too, that links between language and ICT innovations are complex. For instance, findings based on surveys with 202 refugees and migrants and 22

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The management of migration between care and control
Pierluigi Musarò

ongoing ‘war on migrants’ is too often framed as a humanitarian emergency: these are some of the images we usually associate with the so-called ‘migration crisis’. 1 Nevertheless, this ‘crisis’ is neither new nor exceptional, especially when viewed through a historical lens. This discourse of an allegedly uncontrolled ‘invasion’ of Europe dates back to the 1990s when the alarming image was first used particularly in the

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

amidst the migrationcrisis’. Focusing on Europe’s border controls, and narratives of national security, Musarò’s chapter critiques the dichotomies between care and control, threat and vulnerability, solidarity and indifference, which are presented in media campaigns and coverage. Musarò argues that the securitised approach to managing migration produces a depoliticised discourse of humanitarianism. The ambiguities and contradictions that

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Locating the monsters in the machine: an investigation of faith
Roda Madziva and Vivien Lowndes

cultural difference, leading to a growth in diversity, segregated societies and the promotion of bad faith (extremism), often associated with Muslim identities (Lentin, 2011). Indeed, issues of the perceived and real problems of the integration of Muslims, and questions about accommodating Islam as a religion, are at the heart of current public policy debates, especially as the current migration crisis continues to unfold, and as Muslim identities become increasingly framed by global events (Statham and Tillie, 2016). Moreover, the rhetoric of the perceived failure of

in Science and the politics of openness
Antonia Lucia Dawes

, inequality, economic entitlement and class struggle. Critical scholars of race have argued this has led to a collapse in anti-racist solidarity and mobilisation whilst racial suffering continues to exist (Gilroy 2012 ; Goldberg 2009 : 19, 158; Lentin 2011 , 2014 ). David Theo Goldberg argued that this widespread ‘racial denial’ held particular weight in the European racial context, where the emergence of particular racisms was intimately tied to the context of migration and so-called ‘migration crisis’, and where the ‘political economy’ of migration criminalised

in Race talk
Antonia Lucia Dawes

hostility that reached epidemic proportions across Italy in the following years as a result of an extremist resurgence and moral panic about the so-called European migration crisis. Amongst the crimes – being referred to in Italian media as a veritable ‘hunt’ of black people (Mascia 2018 ; Affricot 2018 ) – that grabbed the attention of the international media was the wounding of six West African nationals in a racist shooting spree in Macerata on 4 February 2018, followed by the murder of Senegalese street vendor Idy Diene in Florence on 5 March. Diene was the cousin

in Race talk
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

vendors, both Neapolitan and migrant, were accused of selling contraband and failing to pay taxes and licence fees, and City Hall temporarily closed down the market. The emergency created by the rapidly diminishing legitimate and licensed street market spaces around the piazza offered an opportunity for transcultural collective action to emerge between Neapolitans and migrants. This happened in a context of economic deprivation in the city that predated, and was exacerbated by, the wider geopolitical context of austerity and the so-called migration crisis. A number of

in Race talk