Jeremy Sarkin

This article examines the ways in which missing persons have been dealt with, mainly in the former Yugoslavia, to show how the huge advances made in the search for, recovery and identification of those who disappeared is positively impacting on the ability of families to find their loved ones. The article surveys the advances made in dealing with the missing on a range of fronts, including the technical and forensic capacities. It examines some of the other developments that have occurred around the world with regard to the search for, recovery and identification of people and makes recommendations on how to make improvements to ensure that the rights of families around the world, as well as a range of other human rights, including truth and justice, are enhanced.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Andrea M. Szkil

The subject of forensic specialist‘s work with human remains in the aftermath of conflict has remained largely unexplored within the existing literature. Drawing upon anthropological fieldwork conducted from 2009–10 in three mortuary facilities overseen by the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), this article analyses observations of and interviews with ICMP forensic specialists as a means of gaining insight into their experiences with the remains of people who went missing during the 1992–95 war in BiH. The article specifically focuses on how forensic specialists construct and maintain their professional identities within an emotionally charged situation. Through analysing forensic specialists encounters with human remains, it is argued that maintaining a professional identity requires ICMP forensic specialists to navigate between emotional attachment and engagement according to each situation.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

8 Identification, politics, disciplines: missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa1 Nicky Rousseau Locating, exhuming, and identifying human remains associated with mass violence and genocide has come to occupy an impor­tant place in the panoply of transitional justice measures. Although such work cuts across the core transitional justice issues of justice, reparation and truth-telling, it has received surprisingly little critical attention from within the transitional justice field.2 Existing studies, with some exception, can be characterized by

in Human remains and identification
Forensic and archaeological approaches to locating the remains of Holocaust victims
Caroline Sturdy Colls

), forensic archaeologists and anthropologists are now regularly employed to assist the police in the detection and recovery of clandestine burials in domestic missing persons cases.7 Therefore, well-​established protocols now exist for investigations where victims’ bodies have been disposed of illicitly. There are a number of complex reasons why the response to the Holocaust has been quite different. Some relate to the attempts by the perpetrators to hide their crimes, others to the effects of time. These are discussed in more detail in the context of the case study

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

through the door at any moment.3 The disappeared person is in some profound sense both absent and present: in physical body they are absent, but in social terms, they are present – they cannot be laid to rest. Practices of memory and grieving are put on hold. Tracing what has happened and where the missing person or their remains might be becomes a life-consuming task. Those left behind are compelled to search for their relatives: roaming the streets hoping to catch sight of them; racking their brains to think of what might have happened; tracing mobile phone records

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
The bodyand counter-revolutionary warfare inapartheid South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

.4.8.3. TRC Amnesty Hearing, 15–19 September 1997, 22–26 September 1997, 3–13 November 1997, available at www.justice.gov.za/trc/amntrans/ am1997.htm (accessed 1 December 2012). 5/15/2014 12:51:27 PM Apartheid South Africa  221 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 DHR.indb 221 Missing Persons Task Team, Report: The Search for Missing Activists at Post Chalmers near Cradock, Eastern Cape (August 2009). The author was part of the team responsible for exhuming the remains. ‘Necklacing’ describes a method used to kill so-called collaborators

in Destruction and human remains
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

is quick to evacuate or able to withstand fire. And the construction conceals its inhabitants behind a screen or façade. When the World Trade Center towers collapsed, two things happened. First, structures that should have protected people obliterated those that relied on them for survival. Second, the collapse revealed the faces of those who had been concealed, and the way that corporate culture treats those it exploits became plain. Their faces suddenly appeared in the streets, on the missing-person posters pasted on every available surface.26 EDKINS

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

the authorities to disappearance, was in the end about ‘missingness’ as such.14 It was about the need, faced by those with missing relatives but avoided by the more privileged of the rest of us much of the time, to live with two forms of ambiguity. First, the ambiguity of loss: not knowing whether the missing person was dead, or whether they would walk through the door at any moment. Second, the ambiguity of personhood itself, and the way in which we not only do not ‘know’ anyone else for certain – who they are or what they might do next – we do not even ‘know

in Change and the politics of certainty
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

missing-person posters – or, in the case of children missing in the United States in the past, on milk cartons. If the disappearance is part of a larger-scale catastrophe – the collapse of the World Trade Center in New York in 2001, or the Asian tsunami of 2004, for example – the images will be displayed alongside those of other people’s missing friends and relations. When large-scale disappearances are orchestrated by a tyrannical regime, blown-up pictures of those abducted and tortured are held aloft by people protesting the disappearances in demonstrations and

in Change and the politics of certainty