Antonia Lucia Dawes

the market cry, or the way in which the street vendors reached out across racial, linguistic and cultural boundaries to interpellate the potential customer. In this chapter I explore the examples of transcultural and multilingual speech performance related to buying and selling that took place in my fieldwork. I first examine greetings and bartering in Neapolitan, and their importance for migrant street vendors seeking inclusion and acceptance on the city’s streets. I then turn to the frustrating process of bartering in English for Neapolitan street vendors at

in Race talk
Circulating Baldwin in Contemporary Europe
Remo Verdickt

For several years now, James Baldwin’s life, portrait, and work have enjoyed a central place in the public eye. Although social and audiovisual media have made significant contributions to Baldwin’s return to the cultural and political limelight, the circulation of his published writings remains a vital part of the author’s ubiquity. Moreover, since Baldwin’s omnipresence in bookstores transcends an American or even Anglophone context, this international and multilingual circulation contributes to Baldwin’s world literary standing, as befits the self-described “transatlantic commuter.” This article moves beyond the customary approach to Baldwin’s published success by tracing presently circulating European translations of his work. The article examines the historical developments in Baldwin’s European circulation-through-translation from the time of his death (1987) up until the present, including brief discussions of the French, Italian, and West German translations from the 1960s onward. Of special interest are the pioneering and dominant roles that French and Italian publishers have played since the late 1990s, and the acceleration in circulation that took place across the continent in the wake of the films I Am Not Your Negro and If Beale Street Could Talk. The article concludes with a few remarks on the translation strategies of several key publishers in France, Italy, Germany, and Romania.

James Baldwin Review
Sara Wong

would be a large part of their role. They also needed to be both fluent in Spanish and English to be able to work across the multilingual production team – and ideally from Colombia. When Diana Garcia, our lead animator, eventually joined the team, she was the missing piece in our puzzle. This has been an extensive introduction to the ‘who’ of the project and intentionally so because, to us, that is the project. The collective

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt
,
Sharon O’Brien
,
Patrick Cadwell
, and
Dónal P. O’Mathúna

proved useful in overcoming some language barriers, though others persisted ( Munro, 2013 ). The Haiti earthquake illustrates the multilingual nature of humanitarian crises and the importance of translation, as well as the close connection between language and humanitarian ICT innovations. These features are not unique to the Haiti earthquake, and many crises occur in contexts where linguistic diversity is greater. A recent example of the need for translation and interpreting

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Multilingual literatures, arts, and cultures

This comparative volume examines the sustained contribution of migrants to Europe’s literatures, social cultures, and arts over centuries. Europe has never been a continent bounded by the seas that surround it. In premodern times, migrants imprinted the languages, arts, and literatures of the places where they settled. They contributed to these cultures and economies. Some were on the move in search of a better life; others were displaced by war, dispossessed, expelled; while still others were brought in servitude to European cities to work, enslaved. Today’s immigration flows in Europe are not exceptional but anchored in this longue durée process. Iberia/Maghreb, Sicily/Lampedusa, Calais are the three hotspots considered in this volume. These regions have been shaped and continue to be shaped by migrants; by their cultures; their Spanish, Arabic, Italian, and Somali; their French, English and Mandarin languages. They are also shaped by migrants’ struggles. The scholars and artists who wrote Migrants shaping Europe, past and present compose a new significant chapter in the cultural history of European migration by reflecting on the forces that have put people into motion since the premodern period and by examining the visual arts, literature, and multilingual social worlds fostered by migration. This historically expansive and multilingual approach to mobility and expressiveness makes a crucial contribution: migrants as a lifeblood of European cultures.

Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

THE WORK OF Edouard Glissant, about the historical connection between language, power and domination, has been the central guiding force of this book. I mentioned, at the beginning, how his use of the Tower of Babel story has helped me to think about the liberatory possibilities of the multilingual talk that took place in the heterogeneous and multiethnic market places around Piazza Garibaldi in Napoli. Beyond the linguistic confusion, violences and silences of the postcolonial world, he argued that it was possible to build the Tower – in every language

in Race talk
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

carried out in 2012 in those heterogeneous, ethnically diverse and multilingual street markets around the Vasto and Poggioreale neigbourhoods, which are next to the city’s main railway station. I spent nine months on licensed and unlicensed market stalls on Via Bologna; along the main arteries leading away from Piazza Garibaldi (the square in front of the station entrance); and in Poggioreale market, which was a ten-minute journey from Piazza Garibaldi by tram. I worked with people who had been born in Napoli, and people who had arrived in the city as migrants from

in Race talk
Antonia Lucia Dawes

thus powerful or powerless; around language use that was associated with subaltern status and either pride or shame – were central to the processes of cultural meaning-making that I was observing, and part of, in Napoli. People’s pride and self-protectiveness were often predicated on being able to talk, with a consciousness that, historically, talk had been a fraught question. At the same time, Napoli had always been a globalised, multicultural and multilingual reality so cultural protectiveness and closure had always coexisted with open processes of translation and

in Race talk
Exile and migration, from Ibn Hamdîs to Dante
Akash Kumar

reveal that he is not only beyond the halcyon days of youth but that he has been thrust out of his beloved homeland of Siqiliyya . “ Dakartu Siqiliyya wa al-ās yahayyaj lil-nafs tadakāraha ” “Sicilia mia. Disperato dolore / si rinova per te nella memoria” (“I remember Sicily, and pain is kindled in my soul at the memory of her”) (Corrao, 2002 : 161). I am citing the Arabic line alongside an Italian poetic translation and my own, more literal English translation of the Arabic original. I do so in order to adequately represent the multilingual nature of the sort of

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

about crisis, death and decay, in Napoli and globally, in order to protect the possibilities for work that they had carved out for themselves. Particular sorts of dialogical speech genre – typical statements that drew on locally significant narratives about death and dying, as well talk of rights and justice that took inspiration from the language of trade unionism and anti-racist politics – framed the way in which vendors struggled to find a way to keep their market stalls open. This politics of local solidarity was, by necessity, multilingual and multicultural, as

in Race talk