Open Access (free)
From policy to law to regulation

This book explains the beginnings of net neutrality regulation in the United States and Europe, and some of the current debate over access to Specialised Services: fast lanes with higher Quality of Service (QoS). It examines the new European law of 2015 and the interaction between that law and interception/privacy. The book takes a deep dive into UK self- and co-regulation of net neutrality. In each of the national case studies, initial confusion at lack of clarity in net neutrality laws gave way to significant cases, particularly since 2014, which have given regulators the opportunity to clarify their legislation or regulation. The majority of such cases relate to mobile net neutrality, and in particular so-called 'zero rating' practices. The book compares results and proposes a regulatory toolkit for those jurisdictions that intend effective practical partial or complete implementation of net neutrality. It sets out a future research agenda for exploring implementation of regulation. The book outlines competition policy's purpose, referring to the exceptionally rigorous recent analysis of competition law suitability to regulate net neutrality by Maniadaki. Having analysed regulatory tools with little chance of success, it then examines what communications regulators actually do: regulating telecoms access based on the UK case study. The book considers whether zero rating poses a serious challenge to Open Internet use. It explores some of the wider international problems of regulating the newest manifestation of discrimination: zero rating. The book also considers the various means by which government can regulate net neutrality.

We must begin with a quick note on terminology: we are concerned with access to the last mile, not generic services on the Internet. The network access providers are Internet Access Providers (IAPs), not Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Open Internet protection affects IAPs, not generic ISPs (though IAPs offer services too, and are thus both IAPs and ISPs). In this book I will refer specifically to

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Towards Specialised Services?

Executive, Deutsche Telekom, 28 October 2015 1 Three data floods? Video, productivity and innovative services, SpS Eli Noam predicted and regretted the death of common carriage in 1994, as cable economics overcame telecoms principles. 2 Lack of trust on the Internet, combined with a lack of innovation in the QoS offered in the core network over the

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Open Access (free)
Neutrality, discrimination and common carriage

zombie 2 that has sprung to life recently. It is a policy of Internet 3 non-discrimination based on innovation, free speech, privacy and content provider commercial self-interest, imposed on the technocratic economic regulation of telecommunications (telco) local access networks. The regulators, telcos and governments don’t like it one bit. The laws and regulations are formally ‘Open Internet’ not

in Network neutrality

Chapters 2 and 3 , the UK broadband market has relatively low competitive intensity with only one wholesale network for the majority of the population, and has experienced slower rollout to much lower speeds than the United States, South Korea, Norway or the Netherlands. As a result, government and regulator concern has been to encourage investment in faster services by the former monopoly BT. Direct

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neutrality, threatening freedom of expression, equality of opportunity, security, privacy and innovation. Access Now 1 This chapter critically examines the relatively few examples of regulatory implementation of network neutrality enforcement at national level outside the EEA examples of Norway, Slovenia and the Netherlands explored in Chapter

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Open Access (free)
Collecting contacts with Gabrielle Enthoven

2 Female networks Collecting contacts with Gabrielle Enthoven Kate Dorney In her Times obituary Gabrielle Enthoven (née Romaine)1 (1868–1950) was described as an ‘archivist of the theatre’ and an amateur actor who had ‘some success as a dramatic author’.2 For Who’s Who in the Theatre she described herself as a theatre historian and dramatic author […] for many years a prominent amateur actress appearing with the Old Stagers, Windsor Strollers etc. and author of Montmartre, Alhambra 1912; Ellen Young (with Edmund Goulding), Savoy 1916; The Honeysuckle (from D

in Stage women, 1900–50
Implications for jobs and inequality

Networked organisation: implications for jobs and inequality 4 The networked organisation: implications for jobs and inequality Rosemary Batt and Eileen Appelbaum Introduction The vertical integration of production into large hierarchical firms was a dominant organisational form during the twentieth century. Since the 1980s, however, firms have increasingly decentralised production to networks of subcontractors. Organisational boundaries have become blurred, work processes have been fragmented, and new forms of inter-firm contracting and outsourcing of work

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and necessary to: implement a legislative provision or a court order, or prevent or impede serious crimes; preserve the integrity and security of the network, services provided via this network, and the end-users’ terminals; prevent the transmission of unsolicited communications to end-users who have given their prior consent to such

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structural remedies, and the limits of competition policy itself in the Digital Age. As the net neutrality principle refers to all access providers, large or small, it is a consumer protection measure that goes far beyond standard competition law. As network neutrality extends to all consumer IAPs symmetrically, it is not subject to competition law assessments of dominance, as abuse of dominance is not

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