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Social welfare for the twenty-first century

Social democracy has made a political comeback in recent years, especially under the influence of the ‘Third Way’. Not everyone is convinced, however, that ‘Third Way’ social democracy is the best means of reviving the Left's project. This book considers this dissent and offers an alternative approach. Bringing together a range of social and political theories, it engages with some contemporary debates regarding the present direction and future of the Left. Drawing upon egalitarian, feminist and environmental ideas, the book proposes that the social democratic tradition can be renewed but only if the dominance of conservative ideas is challenged more effectively. It explores a number of issues with this aim in mind, including justice, the state, democracy, new technologies, future generations and the advances in genetics.

Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell
and
Peter Hailey

role of government, developing protocols for data sharing, broadening participation, building buy-in at higher levels, the use of qualitative information, incorporating innovative ideas in analysis and new technology. Table 4 summarises these by case study. Table 4: Managing the influences, by country case study

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

she organises into three groups by the geographical regions they come from: South East Asians (from Cambodia, Burma and Thailand), Africans and the third group, comprising Iraqis, Iranians and Afghans. She discovers differences in their ability to use telecommunications technology (e.g. telephones, fax machines and mobile phones), depending on their countries of origin, suggesting that conflict, war or government surveillance hindered their abilities. Leung also observes that exposure to new

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

cautions against a ‘Northern’ perception of new technologies and how they are socially situated, and alerts us to how the existing literature tends to frame attributes, costs and trade-offs in a way far removed from the everyday reality of emergency situations. Similarly, concepts such as ‘data-double’ reflect the concerns of the Global North, such as identity theft ( Whitson and Haggerty, 2008 ). The ‘self as laboratory approach’ is concerned with how users

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy
and
Victoria Russell

, 2018 ), Syria ( Di Giovanni, 2018 ), among others – disinformation campaigns helped justify the closure of borders to refugees, deliberate violence against minorities and the lethal targeting of civilians and those assisting them, among other things. It is not difficult to imagine future scenarios elsewhere. While the risks of disinformation are not new, they have been greatly accelerated and augmented by new technologies and the social and political changes they have

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

the humanitarian sector. We set out our own ‘responsible ambition’ ( Elrha, 2018b ) for humanitarian innovation in 2018 with ethics, participation and local engagement as areas of key concern. The articles by Hunt et al. and Sandvik (Innovation Issue) refer to ethical concerns with the introduction of new actors, practices and technologies along with innovation to the humanitarian sector and the risks involved, particularly for communities affected by crises. As Sandvik notes: Experimental innovation in the testing and application of new technologies and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Valérie Gorin

not only from the illegal war narratives, but on the ethical narratives as well. VG: How do you see the future of advocacy in terms of strategies or challenges? Are new technologies changing anything? MG: At MSF, we think that the use of digital apps, surveillance systems, etc., can be more dangerous in the protection of the people and giving them voice. Because these tools, if not protected correctly, can be used as signals. To use these tools, you have to be extra careful with how you protect [data], how you collect it, how you use and analyse it, because

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

, 2019 : 2). Over the last thirty odd years, however, as they opened their archives for a wide range of research projects, humanitarian organisations such as MSF have faced new issues associated with the deployment of new technologies. Ironically as paper archives became more available, the new records became more fragmentary and archives became more fragile – digital records became more haphazard and ‘natural electronic archives’, to use Esteva’s (2008) definition, took time to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

paid great attention to the use of new technology, such as innovative materials and a photovoltaic panel. Most significantly, the product was shaped by price, impact, scale of production and the desire to produce an affordable product for the humanitarian marketplace. 6 In order to underline this distinction between innovation and architecture, I propose to describe products like the Better Shelter as instances of ‘building without architecture’. They approach shelters as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

the new technology of cinema with the same conviction. The SCF seemed to have been more enthusiastic, being a private charity founded by two activist sisters known for their criticism of government policy during the Great War ( Mahood and Satzewich, 2009 ). Advocacy remained a core value once SCF was founded: ‘it has been our lot to champion children whose parents, country, government or religion happened to be unpopular and this has not made the work of getting funds any easier’ ( Record of the Save the Children Fund [hereafter, Record ], 1921a : 67). Operating

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs