Author: Charles V. Reed

Royal Tourists, Colonial Subjects, and the Making of a British World, 1860-1911 examines the ritual space of nineteenth-century royal tours of empire and the diverse array of historical actors who participated in them. The book is a tale of royals who were ambivalent and bored partners in the project of empire; colonial administrators who used royal ceremonies to pursue a multiplicity of projects and interests or to imagine themselves as African chiefs or heirs to the Mughal emperors; local princes and chiefs who were bullied and bruised by the politics of the royal tour, even as some of them used the tour to symbolically appropriate or resist British cultural power; and settlers of European descent and people of colour in the empire who made claims on the rights and responsibilities of imperial citizenship and as co-owners of Britain’s global empire. Royal Tourists, Colonial Subjects, and the Making of a British World suggests that the diverse responses to the royal tours of the nineteenth century demonstrate how a multi-centred British-imperial culture was forged in the empire and was constantly made and remade, appropriated and contested. In this context, subjects of empire provincialized the British Isles, centring the colonies in their political and cultural constructions of empire, Britishness, citizenship, and loyalty.

Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Colonial powers and Ethiopian frontiers 1880–1884 is the fourth volume of Acta Aethiopica, a series that presents original Ethiopian documents of nineteenth-century Ethiopian history with English translations and scholarly notes. The documents have been collected from dozens of archives in Africa and Europe to recover and present the Ethiopian voice in the history of Ethiopia in the nineteenth century. The present book, the first Acta Aethiopica volume to appear from Lund University Press, deals with how Ethiopian rulers related to colonial powers in their attempts to open Ethiopia for trade and technological development while preserving the integrity and independence of their country. In addition to the correspondence and treatises with the rulers and representatives of Italy, Egypt and Great Britain, the volume also presents letters dealing with ecclesiastical issues, including the Ethiopian community in Jerusalem.

Charles V. Reed

Instead of wasting British time through improvement projects and economic development, Lytton proposed, the British ought to hold a grand durbar to celebrate Victoria’s new title, Empress of India. This chapter explores how colonial officials embraced this impulse toward ornamentalism between 1860 and 1911 by developing a shared repertoire of ritual practices across the British Empire and how these

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Charles V. Reed

. Much more recently, Cannadine’s Ornamentalism used the grand ritual ceremonies of empire, particularly in the Raj, to explore the reinvention of the monarchy during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 8 In a rather different vein, scholars of historical anthropology and ‘area studies’ have understood colonial rituals as part of a larger effort to acquire and use colonial knowledge for

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Charles V. Reed

, and local people – to various ends. Yet the reality of the Great Queen was rather different. The ornamentalism described by Cannadine, and the willing role played by the monarchy in it, was an imperial fantasy. Indeed, Victoria’s attitudes to royal visits to the empire reflect a certain ambivalence and reluctance about empire that contrast sharply with the mythology. While Victoria relished Benjamin

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

.queen-victorias-scrapbook.org/ . 17 Cannadine quotes P. D. Morgan on the need to reach a ‘synoptic view’ of the imperial system in his Ornamentalism: How the British Saw Their Empire (London: Allen Lane, 2001 ). The source is Philip D. Morgan, ‘Encounters between British and “indigenous” peoples, c . 1500– c . 1800’, in Martin Daunton and Rick Halpern (eds), Empire and

in The British monarchy on screen
Charles V. Reed

British ornamental imagination. The ritual practices of the royal tour were on full display in Delhi. George V received and gave addresses. The viceroy gave and received visits with the princely elite, and the King granted private audiences to the more important princes. Massive tents were erected to serve as residences for visiting dignitaries. Like his uncle, Prince Alfred, the King went tiger hunting in

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Yulia Karpova

the subtly painted portraits in frames of ‘festive gold ­ornament’ – perfectly in tune with the classicist sympathies inherent to socialist ­realism. As properly ‘orthodox’ artworks, the vases were exhibited in the State Hermitage Museum.12 KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 27 20/01/2020 11:10 28 Comradely objects Yet one should not overestimate the role of figurative elements in early 1950s decorative art. Although encouraged, realistic depiction was avoidable. First, purely ornamental decoration was justified if it was based on folk art, which made it art of

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Bill Prosser

flows and flows, methodically and repetitiously, but it is very cooling, very refreshing.31 Doodles spawn here, in the stream of boredom. It repeatedly hatches a teeming population of geometric patterns, organic fantasies, bizarre figures, hybrid animals, daisy-chain margins and merry-go-round calligraphs. Pictorially, these animate the moribund and invigorate the ornamental, becoming inadvertent ‘gateways to the imagination’.32 Having nothing particular or interesting to do evacuates the mind of impediments to drawing – from mere disinclination to graphic

in Beckett and nothing