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Paradoxes of hierarchy and authority in the squatters movement in Amsterdam
Author: Nazima Kadir

This book is an ethnographic study of the internal dynamics of a subcultural community that defines itself as a social movement. While the majority of scholarly studies on this movement focus on its official face, on its front stage, this book concerns itself with the ideological and practical paradoxes at work within the micro-social dynamics of the backstage, an area that has so far been neglected in social movement studies. The central question is how hierarchy and authority function in a social movement subculture that disavows such concepts. The squatters’ movement, which defines itself primarily as anti-hierarchical and anti-authoritarian, is profoundly structured by the unresolved and perpetual contradiction between both public disavowal and simultaneous maintenance of hierarchy and authority within the movement. This study analyzes how this contradiction is then reproduced in different micro-social interactions, examining the methods by which people negotiate minute details of their daily lives as squatter activists in the face of a funhouse mirror of ideological expectations reflecting values from within the squatter community, that, in turn, often refract mainstream, middle class norms.

Open Access (free)
The autonomous life?
Nazima Kadir

archives, but such a project is outside the limits of an ethnography of a movement between 2005–08 based on interviews and participant observation. This historical background intends to demonstrate a lineage for the activities that comprise the internal movement culture as well as display the repetition and circularity of this movement over the past forty years. In addition, this background serves to contextualize the interactions between squatters and the front stage of the media, the state, and the press and

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Paul Henley

film-making did not involve academic anthropologists in a direct or active way in the production itself, nor was it necessarily based on prior academic research. However, its underlying production methods were similar to the field research methods typically employed by academic ethnographers in the sense that they were based on a prolonged period of participant-observation by the film-makers of a relatively small group of people or of a specific social institution, often over several months or even years, and they could also involve, even if only implicitly, some

in Beyond observation
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

corruption is seen as one of the biggest obstacles to conflict resolution and access to justice, people added a simple sentence to the slogan to change its meaning. The slogan then read: ‘the doors of the prison are big, to take all the big thieves out’.15 The expression was a critique of the lack of justice, in particular of the impunity of those who commit the major crimes (UPDI Representative 2010; Participant Observation III 2009). This slogan was reflected in many forms and shapes in Bukavu, and in other cities and territories. A Group Jeremie representative

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

the most important defining feature of this genre of film-making. Although there is a range of different takes on what exactly constitutes the ‘ethnographic method’, central to most definitions is what is known as ‘participant-observation’ (though this term was not actually used by Malinowksi himself). In practical terms, ‘participant-observation’ is usually taken to imply total immersion in the daily life of a particular human social group over a prolonged period of time. It typically requires interaction not just with the great and the good

in Beyond observation
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

; Participant Observation XII 2010; UN Population Fund 2011: 68). Funding comes from a combination of remnants of government health service, INGOs and foreign government aid funding. Figure 6.6  Maternity hospital, Mabuku, photographed 1 August 2010 172 Creative survival as subversion Patients are asked to pay for the services and ‘if someone does not have money, they can bring a goat so that it can be eaten by those working on the construction site’ (Ngoma and Luzolo 2010). The same applies to staff salaries and the provision of medicines. The South Kivu provincial

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time
Cate Turk

consumption, performance and negotiation associated with maps or mapping projects. In practical terms, a variety of methods are used to examine mapping processes. Kitchin, Gleeson and Dodge (2013) employ an insider ethnography to relate the dynamic process of data collection and map making/use/re-use/ re-authoring, akin to a diary or narrative journal of the life of their map(s). Through interviews and participant observation, Del Casino and Hanna (2006) used performative and ethnographic methods to explore their ‘map spaces’. Chris Perkins writes too that performative

in Time for mapping
Paul Henley

version made for US television by Denzel Washington. This commentary often directly endorses the many constructed simultaneities of the action. But underlying all this cinematographic construction, the film remains based on a close participant-observation of Baka life carried out, over a prolonged period, within a relationship of trust developed between film-makers and subjects. It was surely this that permitted the intimate style of camerawork through which the audience is invited to get to know the Baka, not as curious small people of the

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

becoming increasingly rare as the 1990s progressed, British television continued to support documentary series that were ‘para-ethnographic’ in the sense defined in the Introduction to this part of the book. Paul Watson returned to the form in two series that were very different in terms of their subject matter but which were both based on participant-observation of the subjects over a prolonged period: one of these, Sylvania Waters , concerned a nouveau riche middle-class family in a wealthy suburb of Sydney, broadcast

in Beyond observation
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

(South Kivu) to ease the sour relationship between civil society (population) and the military (Participant Observation XIV 2010). The purpose of this workshop is best described in the words of the Civil Affairs officer in his opening speech: ‘there needs to be collaboration and cohesion between society and power in order to render results towards peace and stability’ (MONUSCO Civil Affairs Officer (no. 191) 2010). This officer is voicing not only the perception that people’s solidarity with the armed groups is a real impediment for the statebuilding mission, but the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making