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New perspectives on socially engaged performance

The book advances our understanding of performance as a mode of caring and explores the relationship between socially engaged performance and care. It creates a dialogue between theatre and performance, care ethics and other disciplinary areas such as youth and disability studies, nursing, criminal justice and social care. Challenging existing debates in this area by rethinking the caring encounter as a performed, embodied experience and interrogating the boundaries between care practice and performance, the book engages with a wide range of different care performances drawn from interdisciplinary and international settings. Drawing on interdisciplinary debates, the edited collection examines how the field of performance and the aesthetic and ethico-political structures that determine its relationship with the social might be challenged by an examination of inter-human care. It interrogates how performance might be understood as caring or uncaring, careless or careful, and correlatively how care can be conceptualised as artful, aesthetic, authentic or even ‘fake’ and ‘staged’. Through a focus on care and performance, the contributors in the book consider how performance operates as a mode of caring for others and how dialogical debates between the theory and practice of care and performance making might foster a greater understanding of how the caring encounter is embodied and experienced.

An ‘aesthetics of care’ through aural attention
Sylvan Baker and Maggie Inchley

below has been previously used to create plays by verbatim playwrights for theatre, we have adapted its approach in ways that we argue facilitates forms of caring, participatory practice and performance. The shift enables a ‘care-full’ and caring form of speaking and listening to be part of an ethical encounter between adult carers and young people. This palpably demonstrates that the latter have substantive contributions to make in the ongoing debate around practices of care, while allowing us to frame dialogue in spaces and contexts where they feel they are being

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

opportunity to inform the history of books and reading with the approaches of contemporary digital media theory and criticism. As the critic Thomas Pettitt has suggested when arguing for the idea of a ‘Gutenberg Parenthesis’, in which pre- and post-print media share more in common with each other than either does with print media, medieval literature and modern digital culture intersect in a variety of ways. As I trace these historical intersections of medieval and digital media studies through participatory practices, I show how experiences now perceived as characteristic

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Felix M. Bivens

high-quality participatory practices and processes globally through the work of students, alumni and a variety of partnerships with individuals and institutions worldwide. It is grounded in a process of critical reflection on experience and combines residential intensivestudy periods with a longer period of action research in a work-based placement. (2008, p. 366) The course turns on the concept of praxis. The basic premise is that experienced practitioners and activists come to IDS for one residential term (ten weeks), on a short leave of absence from work

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
Nonreading in late-medieval England
Heather Blatt

physically, intellectually, and emotionally; how they identified with a narrative or a character; how they related to the text’s material qualities or its material surroundings; and how they related to them temporally. Further forms of participatory reading, such as question poems and other ludic works, and immersion such as that promoted in medieval devotional reading and experienced today when playing most video games, could also invite participation.2 Participatory practices, accordingly, fostered a literary culture of exchange and community. By emphasizing

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book
Heather Blatt

, manifest how the participatory practice of corrective reading, as noted today in conversations about open-access editing, enables conferment of ‘group identity’, and facilitates ‘the textualization of social relations’.49 Through emendation invitations, late-medieval English texts become bodies through which not only changing ideas about readership, authorship, and participation in literary culture become worked out, but that also reflect the complex networks of social relations in an increasingly socially mobile culture. Emendation invitations depict how writers

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’
Heather Blatt

materiality. Yet the participatory materiality of the subtleties is not conditioned by these aspects alone. The specifics of the coronation location, the person reciting the verses aloud, the audience who reads these verses through aural apprehension, and the king who is positioned to read the verses directly, show how the verses invite participation as a mode of reading through interaction between many distinct circumstances shaped or defined by materiality. In this way, material reading becomes an embodied, participatory practice. The participatory materiality of the

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes
Heather Blatt

been assessed by critics as crucial to how Lydgate authorizes himself and his work in the wake of Chaucer’s influence and his desire to develop himself as a poet in Chaucer’s mould.28 In the poem’s prologue, Lydgate relates the arrival of Chaucer’s pilgrims in Canterbury. Lydgate thus depicts the reading practice of immersion – most familiar to readers today by its deployment as the primary participatory practice operative in video games that function through the selection and play of user-chosen, userdesigned avatars – by inserting himself into the frame narrative

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England