Jane Humphries

11 Plague, patriarchy and ‘girl power’ Jane Humphries Introduction The inspiration for this chapter comes from an earlier contribution, written with Jill Rubery in 1984, which surveyed theories of social reproduction and its relationship to the economy. We argued that the family, notwithstanding its extensive responsibilities for reproducing, training and socialising future workers, had not been established as an interesting, central and dynamic variable for ­economic analysis (Humphries and Rubery, 1984). Instead, across the whole spectrum of theoretical

in Making work more equal
Neil Macmaster

10 From women’s radical nationalism to the restoration of patriarchy (1959–62) The final stages of the war from late 1959 until early 1962 saw the most overt and radical phase of women’s nationalist activism and evident signs of the failure of the emancipation agenda to make any significant or durable impact on Muslim women. However, this apparent sign of female radicalisation proved to be illusory since at a more hidden, but potent level, it was paralleled during the final years of the war by two developments that in the long term were to carry enormous

in Burning the veil
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

, patriarchy and inequality. But humanitarian actors should be held to high standards, because they derive their power from their claims to uphold higher values. The Charity Commission report into SCUK starts by saying that ‘[w]e trust in the selfless motive behind charity, a motive that encourages us to think about the needs and interests of others and not just ourselves’ ( Charity Commission, 2020 ). But this assertion – these good intentions – cannot be allowed to stand in for critical

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Robert J. Corber

The author reviews Barry Jenkins’s 2018 film adaptation of Baldwin’s novel, If Beale Street Could Talk, finding that Jenkins’s lush, painterly, and dreamlike visual style successfully translates Baldwin’s cadenced prose into cinematic language. But in interpreting the novel as the “perfect fusion” of the anger of Baldwin’s essays and the sensuality of his fiction, Jenkins overlooks the novel’s most significant aspect, its gender politics. Baldwin began working on If Beale Street Could Talk shortly after being interviewed by Black Arts poet Nikki Giovanni for the PBS television show, Soul!. Giovanni’s rejection of Baldwin’s claims that for black men to overcome the injuries of white supremacy they needed to fulfill the breadwinner role prompted him to rethink his understanding of African American manhood and deeply influenced his representation of the novel’s black male characters. The novel aims to disarticulate black masculinity from patriarchy. Jenkins’s misunderstanding of this aspect of the novel surfaces in his treatment of the character of Frank, who in the novel serves as an example of the destructiveness of patriarchal masculinity, and in his rewriting of the novel’s ending.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Black Women as Surrogates of Liberation in James Baldwin’s If Beale Street Could Talk
Marquita R. Smith

This essay analyzes how James Baldwin’s late novel If Beale Street Could Talk represents Black women’s care work in the face of social death as an example of how Black women act as surrogates for Black liberation giving birth to a new world and possibilities of freedom for Black (male) people. Within the politics of Black nationalism, Black women were affective workers playing a vital role in the (re)creation of heteronormative family structures that formed the basis of Black liberation cohered by a belief in the power of patriarchy to make way for communal freedom. This essay demonstrates how Beale Street’s imagining of freedom centers not on what Black women do to support themselves or each other, but on the needs of the community at large, with embodied sacrifice as a presumed condition of such liberation.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

achieving humanitarian goals. However, gender-transformative humanitarian action must build on and support existing cultural values, practices and movements that challenge patriarchy. Finally, I also recognise that engaging in gender-transformative action requires humanitarian actors to challenge patriarchy within the sector itself. Due to limited space, the references cited in this text may not do justice to the richness of existing literature, especially by feminist scholars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Catherine Akurut

continuation of patriarchy, which as Holter (1997 : 839) defines, is the ‘long-term structure of the subordination of women’. Ward believes this affects the decade-long endeavours to obtain gender equality by the feminists’ movement. While extending services designed for women to men is better than offering no services, it is problematic and fails to consider what genuinely gender-inclusive programming would look like. This reveals a blind spot regarding gender

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

Christian cultures after which it was shaped, and which helped shape patriarchy around the world’ (page 45). The patriarchal nature of humanitarian culture, and its colonial roots and legacies, is also at the heart of Charlotte Lydia Riley’s commentary on #AidToo. Riley explores how the sector’s power hierarchies serve to facilitate an environment in which it is hard to call out sexual abuse, harassment and assault, an environment in which ‘powerful men are protected by their image as humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

tentacles of a regressive ‘Third World patriarchy’ ( Olivius, 2014 ). In contrast to the construction of refugee women, the humanitarian aid worker is defined by technocracy and efficiency ( Olivius, 2016 : 280). Other categories of humanitarians such as corporations are often represented in media discourse as good corporate citizens while celebrity activists are narrated as beautiful and stylish ‘global mothers’, dedicated to the wellbeing of refugee women

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

Lebanon ’, Social Politics , 1 : 3 , 271 – 85 . Joseph , S. ( 1996 ), ‘ Patriarchy and Development in the Arab World ’, Gender & Development , 4 : 2 , 14 – 19 . Joseph , S. ( 2004 ), ‘ Conceiving

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs