Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Convergence, emergence and divergence
Simon Parry

1 Science in performance: convergence, emergence and divergence Starting with a (big) bang Sir Ian McKellen as Prospero: Miranda, go out into the world. Will you be for all of us gathering here our eyes, our ears and our hearts? Shine your light on the beautiful diversity of humanity. Understand those rights that protect us. Look up, stretch your wings and fly. Will you take the journey for all of us and will you set us free? Professor Stephen Hawking: We live in a universe governed by rational laws that we can discover and understand. Look up at the stars and

in Science in performance
Open Access (free)
Simon Parry

alongside technological developments. Despite this long history and the deleterious effects of motion sickness on militaries, economies and nice days out, the feeling has not been eradicated either through pharmacology, engineering or lifestyle. Prolonged exposure to the same motion can mean you become habituated through what sailors call getting your sea-legs. However, the only sure fire way to avoid seasickness remains to stay on land. This book has attempted to explore how performance, and forms of artistic or theatrical performance in particular, may resource

in Science in performance
Gob Squad, a funny robot and dancing scientists
Simon Parry

creative interactions between the robot and performers at the opera. Members of the robotics research team started visiting the opera house and, along with Myon, ultimately found themselves in rehearsals and then on stage. The collaboration culminated in a short series of performances on the main stage of the opera house in summer 2015. As I will discuss in more detail below, these were celebratory events involving a large eclectic cast 32 Science in performance and all the theatrical infrastructure of a large state-funded opera. The singers from the opera house

in Science in performance
Open Access (free)
Translating globalised knowledge in performance
Simon Parry

5 Commoning sense: translating globalised knowledge in performance Some time in 2006 when I worked at the Wellcome Trust, I remember being contacted by Matthew Walters, a young creative producer working in the Handsworth area of Birmingham (UK). He reported on a successful first meeting between a group of grime MCs and dermatologists at the local hospital. I remember this moment as, for some reason, the meeting between grime MCs and dermatologists seemed to exemplify a pioneering and important act of boundary-crossing. It was notable or unusual because of the

in Science in performance
Theatre of Debate
Simon Parry

Debate. I devote this chapter to a study of Y Touring’s work partly because of the length of time over which the company worked in the field and the consequent depth and breadth of their practical exploration of science in performance. However, my focus on Y Touring recognises the significance of their work not just in quantitative terms but also as a carefully designed dramaturgical 94 Science in performance approach that they have called Theatre of Debate. The implications of this approach go beyond producing performance. Theatre of Debate also constitutes a

in Science in performance
Dystopian performatives and vertigo aesthetics in popular theatre
Simon Parry

resource practices of knowledge repair. I argue that the theatrical strategies of this kind of performance might hold scientific knowledge and its objects together with public feelings that could otherwise be (mis)conceived as the kind of disengagement, discomfort or antipathy Atwood characterises. Theatre does this through the mobilisation of the conventions which delineate its inside and outside – the cleavages of theatricality in the terms of Josette Féral I discussed in Chapter 1 – and through theatricality’s consequent capacity to make things unreal, as I have

in Science in performance
Applied drama, ‘sympathetic presence’ and person-centred nursing
Matt Jennings, Pat Deeny, and Karl Tizzard-Kleister

pioneering collaboration, Drama lecturer Dr Matt Jennings has worked with nursing lecturers Pat Deeny and Mary Findon-Henry to improve the communication and interpersonal skills of UU adult nursing and mental health nursing students since 2013. The project initially intended simply to improve the nursing students’ performance in the role-play assessments used to evaluate their clinical skills in the final year of their studies. However, as the project developed, it emerged that specific techniques derived from drama training provided nurses with a systematic approach to

in Performing care
Norman Flynn

2 Fiscal policies, social spending and economic performance in France, Germany and the UK since 1970 Norman Flynn Introduction This chapter looks at the post-1970 development of social policy, its fiscal implications and economic consequences in three European countries. Its purpose is to test a stereotypical ‘left’ proposition, formulated in defence of European social democracy against neo-liberalism, such as: There is a ‘European Social Model’, incorporating a high level of social protection for unemployment and retirement, which, since 1973, has been

in In search of social democracy
Open Access (free)
The production of sports media broadcasts
Roslyn Kerr

Latour (1992) is famous for describing non-humans as the “missing masses” in the study of society. While more recently authors have argued that the increased number of studies examining technology, animals and other non-humans mean that that non-humans are no longer missing (see Sayes, 2014), they remain missing in the study of sports media. There is little attention to the exact technologies utilised by sports producers and how the assemblage of humans such as commentators and technologies such as digital overlays work together to produce the actor-network that is the sports media broadcast.

The goal of this chapter is to begin to remedy this deficiency. The chapter draws attention not to sports media representations, but to the processes by which these representations are produced. It considers how humans and technologies assemble together to produce what we view to be a seamless television broadcast.

In this chapter, the global nature of sporting coverage is considered through Collier and Ong’s (2005) concept of a global assemblage. Following the introduction of this concept, the chapter examines China Central Televison’s production of the 2008 Beijng Olympic coverage, and the history of the broadcasting of the America’s Cup.

in Sport and technology