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Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author: Sara Haslam

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Jonathan Atkin

coarsening of sensibility and imagination In his Introduction to a volume similar to that of Guy Chapman’s ‘miscellany of the Great War’, though published almost a decade earlier, C.B. Purdom stated that his overwhelming reaction to the various personal narratives of the Great War that he had edited was one of the senselessness of the whole thing. As a method of State action, it had no positive qualities, while on an individual basis, although men managed to retain in many cases their courage and spirit of self-sacrifice, these qualities had begun to lose their intrinsic

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Time and space
Saurabh Dube

This chapter is cast as a personal narrative. It unravels how I arrived at inklings and understandings of space and time – alongside those of disciplines and subjects, modernity and identity – that were explored in the Introduction and which lie at the core of this book. At stake are intimations that are at once familiar and strange. For, born to anthropologist parents, I

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

. 50 Alongside the local and occupational spheres of masculine association forming the core of the Pals battalions, we must add familial and fraternal identities. Despite frequent references in men’s personal narratives, this component of Kitchener’s army is largely absent from the historiography. The predominant focus on comradeship mutes fraternal war stories. What makes this more surprising is the long-established army principle that an older serving brother could ‘claim’ a younger sibling to serve alongside him. 51 This could be deployed as a protective measure

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

, brothers signalled fraternal approval. Joining the numbers of middle-class women eager to establish their commitment to the national defence, Phyllis Puckle undertook VAD training, part of the War Office’s initiative to prepare for war. The Puckle siblings later served at Cynfield Hospital, Shrewsbury: Phyllis as a nurse and her sister Mollie as a cook. 63 Their brother George praised their hard work, recognising Phyllis’s satisfaction at ‘really doing something now’. 64 Personal narratives provide rare incidents of brothers providing practical help in support of their

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

, exploded into the arena of the First World War, finding in it the perfect expression and concentration of itself – when for many the gaps in the personal narrative were forced home.58 But this isn’t only about shellshock. ‘Husbands, sons, fathers were missing. Facts were missing. Everywhere the overwhelming sense was one of lack’, writes Geoff Dyer, suggesting that some kind of more general cultural narrative is under attack.59 Jay Winter attests that ‘the history of bereavement was universal history during and then after the Great War in France, Britain and Germany’; it

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Saurabh Dube

articulations of hegemonic and critical representations of the temporal and the spatial; at stake also are epistemic productions, strange and familiar, of space and time. Several of these considerations will emerge through a rather personal narrative in the following chapter . Next I explore how the developmental idea of a surpassing of the past is central to modern imaginaries, of academic and everyday

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

affection for siblings is a common motif in personal narratives. Brothers in the Great War complements the growing scholarship on fatherhood and romantic love by drawing attention to this neglected aspect of men’s emotional development. Brothers present a different masculine role model to younger brothers than fathers do for their sons. 3 The absence of an explicit verbal language of love to represent affectionate sibling relationships must not be equated with an absence of profound feelings. 4 The engrained family culture of ‘felt’ values instilled by parents and

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Collaborations
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

troubled us for a while, raises a number of issues in terms of critical research and its focus on collaboration, intervention and transformation. Of importance are the politics of storytelling – not least, storytelling by those whose personal narratives have been shaped by the move from what is understood as a personal trauma to an asylum application set within the context of political aggression and legal discourse (Shuman and Bohmer, 2004, cited

in Go home?