This book examines the payment systems operating in British hospitals before the National Health Service (NHS). An overview of the British situation is given, locating the hospitals within both the domestic social and political context, before taking a wider international view. The book sets up the city of Bristol as a case study to explore the operation and meaning of hospital payments on the ground. The foundation of Bristol's historic wealth, and consequent philanthropic dynamism, was trade. The historic prominence of philanthropic associations in Bristol was acknowledged in a Ministry of Health report on the city in the 1930s. The distinctions in payment served to reinforce the differential class relations at the core of philanthropy. The act of payment heightens and diminishes the significance of 1948 as a watershed in the history of British healthcare. The book places the hospitals firmly within the local networks of care, charity and public services, shaped by the economics and politics of a wealthy southern city. It reflects the distinction drawn between and separation of working-class and middle-class patients as a defining characteristic of the system that emerged over the early twentieth century. The rhetorical and political strategies adopted by advocates of private provision were based on the premise that middle-class patients needed to be brought in to a revised notion of the sick poor. The book examines why the voluntary sector and wider mixed economies of healthcare, welfare and public services should be so well developed in Bristol.

David Rieff

form part of the same larger global moral project. 2 Given the growing dependence of some of the most important international relief groups, as well as caritative arms of the UN system, on funding from the Gates Foundation and other new philanthropies created in its wake, the humanitarian world seems to have become increasingly resigned to this new dispensation; and realistically it is difficult to see how it could be otherwise. 3 Humanitarian NGOs have to a greater or lesser degree understood this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin
and
Sönke Kunkel

Communications and Philanthropy at the World University Service of Canada) explore past and present traditions in the visual communication of Canadian NGOs. Two overarching goals and concerns shape the discussions following in the essays and conversations. One point this forum would like to put forward is that professional and critical historical inquiry does have a fundamental institutional significance for humanitarian organizations. Professional inquiry, it is true, often focuses more on the ambivalences

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

conversations on their uses of visual communications work for some of the longest lasting partners of the CNHH and, indeed, the oldest NGOs of the country. Beside Sara Falconer of the CRC, founded in 1885, I met Rhonda Rosenberg, Executive Director of the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan (MCoS), founded in 1975, and her Communications Coordinator, Chinye Talabi; Stephanie Leclair, Senior Manager of Communications and Philanthropy at the World University Service of Canada (WUSC), which celebrates its centenary this year (2021); and Zuzia Danielski, Communications Director

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

Chinese philanthropy and Western-style imagery of suffering (14). As in Europe, ‘humanitarian’ images were used prior to the invention of photography, with woodblocks used as early as 1594 to get elites to care about suffering from famine (117). The Chinese Red Cross, founded in 1904, tended to use photos focused less on suffering victims and more on the effective provision of relief (135). This ‘fit with a more general cultural call to action then resounding across China

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond
and
Catia Gregoratti

Gregoratti , C. ( 2019 ), ‘ All under the Same Sky? Celebrity Philanthropy and the Transnational Market for Women’s Empowerment ’, in Farrell , N. (ed.), The Political Economy of Celebrity Activism ( Abingdon : Routledge ), pp. 100 – 14 . Budabin , A

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan
and
Otto Farkas

; McClure and Gray, 2015 ). The Last Mile Mobile Solution (LMMS), developed by World Vision International during that process, has subsequently been applied in over thirty countries, reaching 10 million beneficiaries each year ( USAID, 2019a ; WVI, 2016 ). By 2015, multilateral, bilateral, not-for-profit, private-philanthropy and private-sector organizations had equally created a ‘drive for change’ towards innovation. A snapshot of the donor landscape

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
Aditya Sarkar
,
Benjamin J. Spatz
,
Alex de Waal
,
Christopher Newton
, and
Daniel Maxwell

and alleviating suffering ought to be pursued, with different operating assumptions and models ( Donini, 2010 : S220). The expression includes the multibillion dollar Northern/Western humanitarian movement, rooted in various traditions of charity and philanthropy, as well as local actors, Islamic humanitarian organisations and even military actors. In this paper, we are concerned primarily with the formal humanitarian system, though we make reference to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Felix M. Bivens

18 Community–University Partnership Programme (CUPP), University of Brighton Felix M. Bivens Context In 2003, the University of Brighton (UoB) received a grant from the Americanbased Atlantic Philanthropies Foundation to create an institutional infrastructure for supporting CBR in Brighton and the surrounding counties of East and West Sussex. UoB is an amalgam of several professional colleges that have long served the Sussex region. Because of its history in training nurses, teachers, electricians and other occupations, UoB has had a strong tradition of

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
George Campbell Gosling

simple switch from medical charity to private healthcare – a reformulation rather than a rejection of philanthropy. Philanthropy reformulated The voluntary hospitals underwent a great many changes during the interwar years. Those in the medical technology they employed were matched by changing dynamics in relations with the local and national state, while new styles of fundraising fostered a more democratic relationship with the local community. 7 As far the terms

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48