Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

, RADI-AID, Africa for Norway , www.radiaid.com (accessed 23 January 2021 ). St-Pierre , E. ( n.d. ) Photography 101 Guide: Develop an Eye for Great Photos ( Ottawa, Uniterra – A WUSC and CECI Program ). Document shared by Stephanie Leclair . UNICEF, Guidelines for Journalists Reporting on Children , www.unicef.org/eca/media/ethical-guidelines (accessed 8 January 2021 ). World University Service of Canada (WUSC) / Entraide universitaire mondiale du Canada (EUMC) ( n.d. ), Communications Guide

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Peter C. Little

6 Witnessing e-­waste through participatory photography in Ghana Peter C. Little Introduction Drawing on extended ethnographic research in Agbogbloshie, an urban scrapyard in Accra, Ghana that has become the subject of a contentious electronic waste (e-­waste) narrative, this chapter explores the extent to which citizen1 photography and similar participatory visual research efforts augment contemporary toxic studies in general and e-­waste studies in particular. Attuned to the visual promises, politics, and possibilities of photography in toxic landscapes

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

There are many uses of the innumerable opportunities a modern life supplies for regarding – at a distance, through the medium of photography – other people’s pain. Photographs of an atrocity may give rise to opposing responses. A call for peace. A cry for revenge. Or simply bemused awareness, continually restocked by photographic information, that terrible things happen. Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others The subtitle of historian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

citizenry of photography. From June 1918 to April 1919, the American photographer Lewis Wickes Hine made photographs of refugees and other European civilians affected by World War I while working overseas for the American Red Cross (ARC). Refugees emerged as a new humanitarian subject in direct result of the changing global order that came with World War I. Hine’s photographs and the ARC’s use of them, both shaped and restricted public imagination with regard to refugees, and international spectators’ responses to them. Here, I explore Hine’s refugee photographs and more

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
John Harries, Linda Fibiger, Joan Smith, Tal Adler, and Anna Szöke

This article will query the ethics of making and displaying photographs of human remains. In particular, we will focus on the role of photography in constituting human remains as specimens, and the centrality of the creation and circulation of photographic images to the work of physical anthropology and bioarchaeology. This work has increasingly become the object of ethical scrutiny, particularly in the context of a (post)colonial politics of recognition in which indigenous people seek to recover dominion over their looted material heritage, including the remains of their dead. This ethical concern extends to the question of how and under what circumstances we may display photographs of human remains. Moreover, this is not just a matter of whether and when we should or should not show photographs of the remains of the dead. It is a question of how these images are composed and produced. Our discussion of the ethics of the image is, therefore, indivisible from a consideration of the socio-technical process by which the photographic image is produced, circulated and consumed.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Photography and Social Change in James Baldwin’s America
Makeda Best

This essay explores an exhibition at the Harvard Art Museums, installed in the fall of 2018, entitled Time is Now: Photography and Social Change in James Baldwin’s America.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

The People in the Pictures ( Save the Children, 2017 ) or the Radi-Aid research report ( Girling, 2018 ), a collaboration with the University of East Anglia, address many of the criticisms raised by the use of photography among aid agencies – including the lack of alternative representations and the White Saviour complex – and call for more visual ethics. How could professional historical inquiry link up and connect to the work of communication practitioners? What common ground could

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Infectious Disease
Duncan McLean and Michaël Neuman

contribution Jeffrey Flynn reviews two books, Humanitarian Photography: A History (2015) and The Biafran War and Postcolonial Humanitarianism: Spectacles of Suffering (2017). While his commentary on ethical questions over the use of images is particularly salient today, almost as striking are his observations on how the challenge of framing human suffering ‘has been debated ever since the pain of others could be captured on camera’. The pitfalls of humanitarian imagery are thus noted, as are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

, 2016 ). By 1979, the agency had partnered with educational television to produce a thirteen-part series on development, and with the NFB to sponsor six films for the general public; it also published comics for children and a teachers’ guide, as well as multimedia kits (CIDA, Development Directions , May 1978: 26, 33; Marchand, 1990 ). In 1987, it hosted its own International Development Photo Library (IDPL) which became ‘the go-to resource for international development photography’ for NGOs and agencies devoted to the production and dissemination of development

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

). Photography helped to overcome this barrier: what Scarry has called ‘pain’s inexpressibility’ and resistance to ‘verbal objectification’ ( 1987 ). During a devastating famine in India in 1876–8, a British military official took a series of photographs depicting extremely emaciated men, women and children, and these had a profound impact on the way British elites and audiences mobilised and responded to the famine ( Twomey, 2015 ). Twomey argues that this crisis introduced the practice of displaying shocking images as ‘evidence’ of bodily suffering

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs