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Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

71 countries registering a reduction in political rights and civil liberties ( Freedom House, 2018 ). All of which puts the viability of global liberal institutions increasingly in doubt. This idea of a protected place where, regardless of one’s identity (ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexuality, but also whether or not one is a dissident), one’s basic rights are secure is constitutively liberal. As fewer and fewer governments, and more and more people, view the existence of such a sanctuary within society as fanciful, illegitimate and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Palestine and the ‘special economic zones’ of Jordan, it may appear ironic that ‘one of the largest employers of Palestine refugees’ ( UNRWA, 2016 : 48) is being targeted for ‘disruption’ by the US Administration. However, rather than a total disjuncture between ‘the great deal’ and UNRWA’s employment practices, some (uncomfortable) continuities can be identified between them: UNRWA has provided tens of thousands of jobs to Palestinians across the region, while being unable to secure Palestinians’ political rights, including the collective

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Indigenous people in British settler colonies, 1830s–1910

This book focuses on the ways in which the British settler colonies of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa treated indigenous peoples in relation to political rights, commencing with the imperial policies of the 1830s and ending with the national political settlements in place by 1910. Drawing on a wide range of sources, its comparative approach provides an insight into the historical foundations of present-day controversies in these settler societies.

Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

mind. 3 In this book, where we trace the general and particular circumstances in which political rights were accorded or denied to Indigenous peoples in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, from the 1830s to 1910, Merivale’s twin observations emerge as particularly pertinent. By situating the violence and upheaval of dispossession within a comparative perspective, we hope to identify shifting modes of British and

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

century, settler governments in the Australasian colonies built on their foundation years in their treatment of Indigenous political rights in their political systems. The seven colonies – united by the Pacific region’s proximity to numerous non-European societies, and apprehensive of in particular Chinese immigration and the imperialisms of non-British European powers – contemplated federating into one

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

therefore automatically the property of the British Crown. Whatever political powers were to be allowed to Indigenes, they could not be such as would be capable of blocking or interfering with the continuation of the process of acquiring the land and bringing in White settlers. In New Zealand, a major factor in blocking any real political rights for Maori for the first twenty-five years was settler fear that they could use

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

of Woman (1792), is an important early ‘feminist’ writer. She argued that women should have the same legal rights as men on the grounds of equal humanity, moral worth, rationality and freedom. It was wrong that women should be defined by their sex so as to be denied educational, legal, economic and political rights. Once equality was established there would be a beneficial revolution in the relationship between men and

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

mobility out of America (as part of a claim to be a British subject). To Browne, the legal struggles over which black subjects could be included in the book, often against claims by former masters and opportunists that they were ‘fugitive slaves’, reveals a particular struggle over the racialised codes of personhood. It reveals a struggle over the right to be treated as a person with the possibility of legal and political rights, or be deprived of all personhood and translated into property. What we can begin to see here in these brief examples is that deprivation is not

in Bordering intimacy
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

note that the settlements over political rights in place by the early twentieth century were the outcome of considerable negotiations between competing groups, each with a vital stake in the nature of the so-called democratic governments that these Dominions supported. Close attention to the critical moments in imperial history in the 1830s will clarify our understanding of the new directions of the

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Brent E. Sasley

granted that the world is a secure place for First World [i.e. developed] states and their citizens’, while the same is not true for developing world countries ( Job, 1992 : 11). This chapter’s purpose is to broaden the definition of security by including regimes and societies as essential referent objects of security. Demands for social, economic and political rights across the Middle East have threatened

in Redefining security in the Middle East