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This book reviews a variety of approaches to the study of the European Union's foreign policy. Much analysis of EU foreign policy contains theoretical assumptions about the nature of the EU and its member states, their inter-relationships, the international system in which they operate and the nature of European integration. The book outlines the possibilities for the use of discourse analysis in the study of European foreign policy. It sets out to explore the research problem using a political-cultural approach and seeks to illuminate the cognitive mind-maps with which policy-makers interpret their political 'realities'. The book provides an overview and analysis of some of the non-realist approaches to international relations and foreign policy, and proposes an analytical framework with which to explore the complex interplay of factors affecting European foreign policy. The book suggests one way of seeking theoretical parsimony without sacrificing the most defining empirical knowledge which has been generated about Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) over the years. It argues that while the sui generis nature of CFSP presents an acute problem for international relations theory, it is less pronounced with regard to traditional integration theory. The book discusses the dimensions of European foreign policy-making with reference to the case of arms export controls. Situated at the interface between European studies and international relations, it outlines how the EU relates to the rest of the world, explaining its effort towards creating a credible, effective and principled foreign, security and defence policy.

A political–cultural approach
Lisbeth Aggestam

central research problem is to explore the relevance of the state and investigate whether the agency of foreign policy is now increasingly conceived on the European level by policy-makers. This chapter sets out to explore this research problem using a politicalcultural approach and seeks to illuminate the cognitive mind-maps with which policy-makers interpret their political ‘realities’. Culture is

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

, Oxford, Blackwell. Casson, M. (1982), The Entrepreneur: An Economic Theory, London, Martin Robertson. Fligstein, N. (1996), ‘Markets as politics: a political cultural approach to market institutions’, American Sociological Review, 61(4), pp. 656–73. Harvey, M., McMeekin, A., Randles, S., Southerton, D., Tether, B. and Warde, A. (2001), Between Demand and Consumption: A Framework for Research, CRIC Discussion Paper, No. 40, Manchester, University of Manchester. Harvey, M., Beynon, H. and Quilley, S. (2002), The Human Tomato: Investigations Into Biological and Socio

in Market relations and the competitive process