Search results

Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

’, even experiential, access to would no longer be limited to the memories of events through which one actually lived. This essay will argue that the effects of capitalist commodification and mass culture are not exclusively privatising and therefore conservative; these forces have also opened up the potential for a progressive, even radical politics of memory: such a politics instrumentalises what I have

in Memory and popular film
Ideology, physical destruction, and memory
Rémi Korman

From 1994 onwards, bodies have been at the centre of the politics of memory surrounding the genocide of the Tutsi. As well as constituting evidence in forensic investigations, bodies are on display in the memorials to the genocide. This exhibiting of bodies aims principally to remind visitors of the historical facts of the genocide: the sites of the massacres and the methods used during them. The research carried out by Rwandan institutions with a view to memorialising the genocide is uniformly insistent on the "practices of cruelty" employed during it. Inventories of weapons used during the massacres are accompanied by descriptions of different methods of killing. These methods are also represented in many memorials. This paper will examine how these constructed ideologies of the twentieth century affected the treatment of Tutsis in the Rwandan genocide and the alarming consequences this created for the destruction of dehumanised bodies.

in Destruction and human remains
Robert Burgoyne

. 8 See Alison Landsberg, ‘Prosthetic Memory: The Logic and Politics of Memory in Modern American Culture’ (PhD dissertation, University of Chicago, 1996), p. 13. 9 See Alison Landsberg, ‘America, the Holocaust, and the Mass Culture of Memory: Toward a Radical Politics of Empathy’, New German

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Yulia Karpova

, predominant in the public discourse of contemporary Russia and informed by the politics of memory about the Soviet past. One narrative is reflected in Boris Berlin’s response to my research interests. It depicts Soviet design as plagiaristic, low-quality, neglectful of the consumer, or altogether non-existent. It is shared by some former employees of VNIITE who felt constrained by the bureaucratic structures of these institutions and upset that so few of their ideas could be implemented. In particular, Soloviev (who lived a long life until 2013) is remembered within the

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

/memory, Part II examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. These sites have generated hard fought battles of memory within American historical and political

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Why exhume? Why identify?
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

the Civil War and twenty-five years after the restoration of democracy that the first exhumation of the Republican dead could take place (while the bodies of Francoist combatants and civilians had been honoured much earlier). We must therefore keep in mind that the timing of exhumation always depends on the political (and sometimes geopolitical) context, such as the national politics of amnesty or the local politics of memory. This chronology also depends on unique and complex social contexts that allow (through the emergence of a consensus) or else prevent (when

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

film rather cleverly weaves elements of culture war rhetoric in and within a media fiction (i.e. the 1950s sitcom) whose myths of family idealism and harmonious community it contiguously deconstructs. Rather than a paradigm of narrative confusion, ideological idiocy or historicist blockage, Pleasantville plays reflexively with culture war discourse and its constituent politics of memory. Colourised

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The discovery, commemoration and reinterment of eleven Alsatian victims of Nazi terror, 1947– 52
Devlin M. Scofield

tot, davon 11 ermordert, 3 vermisst und nur 11 sind ins Heim zurückgekehrt’, L’Alsace [probably August 1947], StadtA Offenburg. 42 ‘Die sterblichen Überreste der Maquisards wurden gestern nach Thann überführt’, L’Alsace, 14 November 1947, StadtA Offenburg. 43 For a discussion of the contested politics of memory in France following the Second World War, see G. Namer, La commémoration en France de 1945 à nos jours (Paris: Editions L’Harmattan, 1987), especially ‘La commémoration’, pp. 143–​62. 44 Lagrou, The Legacy of Nazi Occupation, p. 2. 45 Ibid., pp. 26

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Working memory
David Calder

Century Theatre and Film 36.2 (2009): 7. 45 For in-depth analysis and critique of such processes, see Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1995). See also Grant Kester, The One and the Many: Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011). 46 Andreas Huyssen, Present Pasts: Urban Palimpsests and the Politics of Memory (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003). 47 Massey, For Space, 110. 48 Jackie Clarke, ‘Closing Moulinex: Thoughts on the Visibility and

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space