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Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

Critical encounters between state and world

Recognition and Global Politics examines the potential and limitations of the discourse of recognition as a strategy for reframing justice and injustice within contemporary world affairs. Drawing on resources from social and political theory and international relations theory, as well as feminist theory, postcolonial studies and social psychology, this ambitious collection explores a range of political struggles, social movements and sites of opposition that have shaped certain practices and informed contentious debates in the language of recognition.

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broader contexts of anti-colonial nationalism as antecedents and legitimate elements of the field. And to conceive of the field as the provenance of materialist, historicist critics as much as it is of textualist and culturalist critics. If we look at the publication trajectory of postcolonial studies since 1978, and confine the glance only to metropolitan Anglophone academic publications within cultural studies, we find that materialist contributions have been a significant and persistent element throughout this period. The year 1989, for example, saw the publication

in Postcolonial contraventions
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Caribbean and in Britain. At the intellectual level, I have become preoccupied by a number of issues, explored here, that colonial and postcolonial studies have ignored or find difficulty in including in their grander analyses. A commonplace of postcolonial studies is the supposed subversiveness of the colonial/postcolonial subject, through the tropes of mimicry, cultural hybridity, and writing or speaking

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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’s issues per se. From such diverse and relatively modest beginnings, postcolonial studies of the woman-as-nation have since travelled widely in feminist circles, and in productive, cross-border ways. In view of this still-ramifying and, it should be said, still-contested interest, I feel it to be productive in this book to revisit and, variously, to elaborate, modify and consolidate my own thinking (and thus my own original essays) on the woman-nation topic. I also aim to do so within a more comparative, cross-cultural frame than I have attempted before, in order

in Stories of women

distrust of literature’ (Fletcher, 2011 : 23). Certainly in the Caribbean there is limited crossover between those who study the ‘hard’ behavioural sciences and those in humanities. As Fletcher points out, this divide impedes interdisciplinary research and inhibits dialogue with related fields, for example postcolonial studies. Beyond the boundary observed by Fletcher, frontier

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy

globalisation has produced a neocolonial dependency of the chaotic, helpless ‘rest’ on the rational/ised, masculine west.30 I do not want to go as far as Dirlik in suggesting a knowing complicity between postcolonial studies and global neocolonialism. I also do not wish to argue that postcolonial studies in some sense consciously does the ideological work of a global free market, in which cultural diversity is restlessly de-contextualised and commodified.31 Yet it does seem to me that postcolonial criticism is related to, and representative of, the continuing dominance of the

in Stories of women
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What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

identities in eastern Europe, which could not have posed their questions if not for postcolonial scholarship, may struggle to separate race from ethnicity or race from nation. Susan Gal and Gail Kligman's The Politics of Gender after Socialism , a foundational work in postsocialist gender studies on reproductive politics and nationalism in eastern Europe, is informed by postcolonial studies of anti-colonial nationalist movements which, as Partha Chatterjee ( 1993 ) argued, cast women as bearers of tradition while letting men be ‘unmarked, and rational, subjects of

in Race and the Yugoslav region

basing his critique on (among other things) ethnic-identitarian premises, that I too might also have ‘colonised’ allegiances and concerns. My own experience as the black multiracial daughter of a black Marxist academic, the publisher and editor of the US journal The Black Scholar, has been crucial in making sense of my own responses to postcolonial debates. But at the same time, arguments in postcolonial studies surely cannot stand or fall on the basis of each critic’s national/racial origins. And any critic who elevates Spivak as an exclusive or foundational example

in Postcolonial contraventions
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the footsteps of eastern European feminists using postcolonial theory to explain how post-Cold-War western European feminists had marginalised eastern European women's perspectives (Slavova 2006 ; Cerwonka 2008 ; Tlostanova 2010 ). Robert Kulpa and Joanna Mizielińska's volume De-Centring Western Sexualities (Kulpa and Mizielińska (eds) 2011 ) fitted into a wider queer postcolonial studies framework in critiquing assumptions about ‘eastern Europe lagging behind the West’ (i.e. assumptions that Western trajectories of LGBTQ politics were the most advanced or

in Race and the Yugoslav region