Cultural readings of race, imperialism and transnationalism
Author: Laura Chrisman

This book analyses black Atlantic studies, colonial discourse analysis and postcolonial theory, providing paradigms for understanding imperial literature, Englishness and black transnationalism. Its concerns range from the metropolitan centre of Conrad's Heart of Darkness to fatherhood in Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk; from the marketing of South African literature to cosmopolitanism in Achebe; and from utopian discourse in Parry to Jameson's theorisation of empire.

Laura Chrisman

chapter8 21/12/04 11:21 am Page 138 8 Robert Young and the ironic authority of postcolonial criticism When I chanced on postcolonial scholar Robert Young’s Textual Practice review of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s Outside in the Teaching Machine, I was startled to find an attack on Benita Parry among its pages.1 It comes early on, when Young is preparing the ground for a detailed exposition of Spivak’s book by comparing Spivak’s general critical standing with that of Edward Said and Homi Bhabha (who together create Young’s chief constellation of postcolonial

in Postcolonial contraventions
Barbra Mann Wall

9 Changes in nursing and mission in post-colonial Nigeria Barbra Mann Wall Introduction In 1914, Britain created the country of Nigeria by joining northern and southern protectorates together. In a colonisation process that lasted more than forty years, the British employed treaties, battles, threats of deportation and collaboration with compliant local rulers as they established a policy of ‘indirect rule’. Yet racial discrimination and other forms of alienation led to anti-colonial protests and nationalist resistance movements. After the Second World War

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

his own book, The Biafran War and Postcolonial Humanitarianism . Even though images of emaciated adults and starving children were not new, Biafra did produce innovations. First, Heerten highlights how a newly emerging Holocaust consciousness in the 1960s affected the reception of images coming out of Biafra in summer 1968. In fact, he maintains that this way of viewing the images from Biafra – as a potential African Auschwitz – was itself part of cementing Holocaust

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

may purchase these products. They thus shared substantive similarities, but it is the visibility and legitimacy accorded to them by the global refugee agency that prompted us to research them further to apprehend the specific logics that inform them. In what follows, we first locate our article within postcolonial feminist debates in gender and development and the ways in which such scholarship enables a critical analysis of humanitarian initiatives seeking to empower

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Between “Stranger in the Village” and I Am Not Your Negro
Jovita dos Santos Pinto, Noémi Michel, Patricia Purtschert, Paola Bacchetta, and Vanessa Naef

James Baldwin’s writing, his persona, as well as his public speeches, interviews, and discussions are undergoing a renewed reception in the arts, in queer and critical race studies, and in queer of color movements. Directed by Raoul Peck, the film I Am Not Your Negro decisively contributed to the rekindled circulation of Baldwin across the Atlantic. Since 2017, screenings and commentaries on the highly acclaimed film have prompted discussions about the persistent yet variously racialized temporospatial formations of Europe and the U.S. Stemming from a roundtable that followed a screening in Zurich in February 2018, this collective essay wanders between the audio-visual and textual matter of the film and Baldwin’s essay “Stranger in the Village,” which was also adapted into a film-essay directed by Pierre Koralnik, staging Baldwin in the Swiss village of Leukerbad. Privileging Black feminist, postcolonial, and queer of color perspectives, we identify three sites of Baldwin’s transatlantic reverberations: situated knowledge, controlling images, and everyday sexual racism. In conclusion, we reflect on the implications of racialized, sexualized politics for today’s Black feminist, queer, and trans of color movements located in continental Europe—especially in Switzerland and France.

James Baldwin Review
John Harries, Linda Fibiger, Joan Smith, Tal Adler, and Anna Szöke

This article will query the ethics of making and displaying photographs of human remains. In particular, we will focus on the role of photography in constituting human remains as specimens, and the centrality of the creation and circulation of photographic images to the work of physical anthropology and bioarchaeology. This work has increasingly become the object of ethical scrutiny, particularly in the context of a (post)colonial politics of recognition in which indigenous people seek to recover dominion over their looted material heritage, including the remains of their dead. This ethical concern extends to the question of how and under what circumstances we may display photographs of human remains. Moreover, this is not just a matter of whether and when we should or should not show photographs of the remains of the dead. It is a question of how these images are composed and produced. Our discussion of the ethics of the image is, therefore, indivisible from a consideration of the socio-technical process by which the photographic image is produced, circulated and consumed.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

non-intervention, and came to see that the (post)colonial run-up to genocide was a story of too much intervention, even in the name of democracy. During my doctoral research, I rediscovered the case of Somaliland. A self-declared independent republic in the north-western corner of Somalia, Somaliland had declined US and UN interventions at the beginning of the 1990s, apart from specific assistance (the clean-up of landmines, for example). Instead, it took care of its peace-building process internally and with its diaspora. Over the years, even

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

, these references also lead us into the global 1960s. It is only partly true that Biafra was the first postcolonial conflict that was discussed as a genocide – but the way these references worked changed with Biafra. Already before the American war in South East Asia, what is usually called the Vietnam War was then described as possibly genocidal. This was something that many New Leftists at least were concerned about. Some of their leading figures and intellectuals associated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

.1080/01436597.2015.1135730 . Elrha ( n.d. ), Humanitarian Innovation Fund , www.elrha.org/programme/humanitarian-innovation-fund/ (accessed 27 January 2020) . Heerten , L. ( 2017 ), The Biafran War and Postcolonial Humanitarianism: Spectacles of Suffering ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs