Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

/memory, Part II examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. These sites have generated hard fought battles of memory within American historical and political

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

true beloved, Catherine Parr (Deborah Kerr), the last wife of her late father, Henry VIII (Charles Laughton). Her discussion of the possibilities open to an England with a grand fleet speak to the American imperialism of the early 1950s, the Cold-War obsession with cultural expansion, implicitly transcoding early modern England into postwar America. Simmons’s performance is ominous in the way she speaks

in The British monarchy on screen
Coreen Anne McGuire

Rehabilitation of the Respiratory Cripple ’, The Lancet , 274 : 7110 ( 1959 ), 1033 . 115 Ibid. 116 Williamson , B. , ‘ Electric Moms and Quad Drivers: People with Disabilities Buying, Making, and Using Technology in Postwar America ’, American Studies , 52 : 1 ( 2012 ), 5 – 30 , p. 23. 117 Ibid., p. 11. 118 Barr, ‘The Iron Lung’, p. 256. 119 Brown, J., ‘The Last of the Iron Lungs’, Gizmodo , 20 November 2017. https://gizmodo.com/the-last-of-the-iron-lungs-1819079169 . Accessed June 2019. 120 Ibid. 121 Ibid. 122 Albrecht and Devlieger, ‘The

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Defending Cold War Canada
Katie Pickles

. 8 Joanne Meyerowitz (ed.), Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945–1960 (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994 ). 9 Echoes , 191 (summer 1958), 23. 10 Mrs Cecil L. Brown, national convener of the

in Female imperialism and national identity