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Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

An assessment of EU development aid policies

human well-being as a manifestation of human freedom’ and that most non-democratic states performed badly in terms of economic growth and poverty reduction (World Bank, 2000: 112–13). Donor states, on the other hand, were more overt in maintaining democratic conditions as a key element of the new political conditionality, however uneven the practice (see Baylies, 1995; Olsen, 1998). Overall, therefore, the early 1990s further broadened the extent to which aid would be conditional upon ‘internal’ actions and policies of recipient states. Alongside the existing demand

in EU development cooperation
Open Access (free)
The potential and limits of EU development cooperation policy

for good governance and the rule of law (CEC, 2001). Cotonou’s new emphasis on poverty reduction and eradication (Article 1) is to be welcomed. It is difficult to believe that this has not been the goal of EU development policy thus far. Development assistance in all its forms should surely be directed at the poor wherever they might be located. The conception of poverty used by the Commission is also to be commended as it moves away from a lack of resources approach towards a more multifaceted conception that includes issues of vulnerability that might not be

in EU development cooperation
Effective support structures for community– university partnerships

advocates of community–university research partnerships in that country. First, at the most fundamental level, the university sector in Ghana is badly underfunded by its national government. Second, government does not see value in directly including a role for the universities in its development and poverty-reduction strategies, such as Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers aimed at achieving targets towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). ‘One needs to answer the question whether this is a reflection of the failure of the institutions themselves to demonstrate

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
Conceptual links to institutional machineries

those who measure human development, from sex disaggregation to empowerment (the GDI and GEM3), these quantitative scores still leave us with gaps in understanding gender inequality in ways that are difficult to reduce to numbers. Moreover, empowerment measures should be linked to poverty reduction, given women’s over-representation below poverty lines. To count some women in economic and political decision-making positions does not necessarily connect to power relations that relegate many desperately poor women to lives stripped of entitlement and endowment.4

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Open Access (free)
War economies, peace economies and transformation

such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, to rural poverty reduction led by international NGOs and local community-based organisations (CBOs). In war-affected areas, however, it is increasingly recognised that attention needs to be paid to 3 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 4 Building a peace economy? the illicit and illegal economic activities which often come to support and feed off violence. Standard economic reforms fail to adequately address these activities, and thus tailored policies are needed to

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)

design policies which strengthen that relationship, then the non-conjunction of antipoverty and pro-environment strategies may eventually fade to insignificance. However, in order to design such policies, we first need to understand when poverty reduction might be allowed to trump sustainability and vice versa. Of course, much will ultimately depend upon the particular circumstances within which such judgements are made, yet Dobson is wrong to believe that this is always a matter of empirical determination. In other words, we can devise general rules which allow such

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)

product for many Caribbean nations and they have “become the most often-cited, tangible evidence and measuring stick for the ties connecting migrants with their societies of origin” (Guarnizo, 2003 , p. 666). Money sent home can have a significant impact on local economies, market development, poverty reduction and economic growth, especially because money from remittances exceeds flows of foreign

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

modified approach to trade liberalisation, with greater emphasis on poverty reduction. Speaking to the World Bank development Committee in April 2000, Commissioner Nielson said that the objective was ‘globalisation with a human face’. He went on to say that ‘while there is no alternative to an open and liberal world economy, this is not an end in itself. Political action is required to harness not only the potential and oppor50 EUD3 10/28/03 2:41 PM Page 51 The unimportance of trade preferences tunities offered by the global economy, but also to limit the transition

in EU development cooperation
State-based institutions to advocate for gender equality

ideologies and memberships, the relative importance of high finance or crime in political contests). • The nature and power of the state and its bureaucracies — whether it is a developmental state, whether it has the will and capacity to enforce change in the culture and practices of its bureaucracies, whether the public service has internalized a commitment to social equity, poverty reduction, and so on. The prospects of women influencing policy will be further shaped by the institutions which organize opportunities for consultation and dialogue with officials, for formal

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?