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Gender, sexuality and transgression
Author: Jenny DiPlacidi

This book demonstrates that incest was representative of a range of interests crucial to writers of the Gothic, often women or homosexual men who adopted a critical stance in relation to the heteronormative patriarchal world. In repositioning the Gothic, representations of incest are revealed as synonymous with the Gothic as a whole. The book argues that extending the traditional endpoint of the Gothic makes it possible to understand the full range of familial, legal, marital, sexual and class implications associated with the genre's deployment of incest. Gothic authors deploy the generic convention of incest to reveal as inadequate heteronormative ideologies of sexuality and desire in the patriarchal social structure that render its laws and requirements arbitrary. The book examines the various familial ties and incestuous relationships in the Gothic to show how they depict and disrupt contemporary definitions of gender, family and desire. Many of the methodologies adopted in Gothic scholarship and analyses of incest reveal ongoing continuities between their assumptions and those of the very ideologies Gothic authors strove to disrupt through their use of the incest trope. Methodologies such as Freudian psychoanalysis, as Botting argues, can be positioned as a product of Gothic monster-making, showing the effect of Gothic conventions on psychoanalytic theories that are still in wide use today.

José Luís Fiori

sovereignty. But it is more likely that the world system will go through a prolonged period of turbulence and wars provoked by sudden changes and increasingly unstable alliances, precisely because it is reproducing the history of the formation of the European state system on a planetary scale. Notes 1 Translated from Portugese by Juliano Fiori. 2 In the psychological and psychoanalytical theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, as in the structural anthropology of Claude Lévi-Strauss, mythology occupies a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

, although many presented a more palatable and user-friendly version of psychoanalytic theory. Their main interest was in human relationships and thus their theories were easily adaptable and transferable to industrial firms, management consultancies and government policy advisers. Rose’s argument is that these professionals enabled, even compelled, individuals to govern themselves, and he also presents this

in The metamorphosis of autism
Sawdust and Tinsel and Dreams
Dan Williams

This chapter argues that we can compare key elements in the work of Ingmar Bergman with ideas in the Kleinian tradition of psychoanalytic theory, including specific concepts such as ‘the depressive position’ and the significance of ‘envy’. In particular, the chapter tracks the importance of narrative integration, a key concept from Kleinian aesthetics, in specific passages, paying attention to the details of film style. The chapter considers two films from the 1950s: Sawdust and Tinsel and Dreams, focusing on scenes and sequences where dialogue is absent or minimal. Ingmar Bergman’s continuing engagement with the aesthetics of silent cinema is explored with further reference to key films of that era, which he continued to be fascinated by. The chapter aims to show how an aesthetic influenced by silent cinema is integrated in key passages of the chosen films to explore psychological conflict and reparation. Patterns representing the characters’ inner struggles, in both works, are seen to diverge to an extent from the unresolved conflicts in the influential silent classics that continued to inspire Bergman’s creative methods. The analysis attends to the way both works represent a balance between the inner world of the leading characters and a vivid representation of the social world. Building on established critical writing about these films, the author aims to show that this psychologically intense filmmaking is simultaneously engaged with social conflicts, a balance that accords with work that has sought to reveal the social and political dimensions of Kleinian theory.

in Ingmar Bergman
Bonnie Evans

with actual psychic mechanisms, and then to claim that both were ‘phantasy’. 33 In Glover’s view, the infant built up the means for reality testing before he started to phantasise about the possible directions that his instincts might take. If this was not fully taken into account then there was a danger that psychoanalytic theories would revert to, and support, pre

in The metamorphosis of autism
Bonnie Evans

bridging gaps between psychoanalytic theory and the theory of developmental psychology, yet he developed this in a slightly different direction than Isaacs, Klein, Winnicott and Bowlby, who had focused on the majority population and on Freudian models in order to develop theories of the mother and child relationship. Instead, Anthony focused on very complex cases that sat at the

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

), added to the equating of its methods with narrative, is what makes psychoanalytic theory a critical tool in the progress of this study. Such theory ‘became in late Victorian and Edwardian times the liberating movement in science’, writes Hynes, as he begins to establish his argument for its partial function as a new faith.31 He posits the theory that the recruitment of Frederick Myers to the banner of Freudianism was less to do with a professional dedication than with a personal quest for a replacement The narrative push 25 system of belief.32 Myers wanted, Hynes

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

domain entirely separate from family life. Although psychoanalytic theory was influential within government policy in the 1960s and 1970s, it was simultaneously being stripped of its descriptive terminology and the language that supported all of its major contentions concerning childhood psychopathology. The science of ‘mental defect’ posed a challenge to these psychoanalytically influenced all

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Chantal Chawaf ’s melancholic autofiction
Kathryn Robson

position of a melancholic: ‘La blessure que je viens de subir’ (p. ; my italics) (‘The wound I have just suffered’ (p. )). In speaking as a melancholic, rather than as an analyst, she seems to suggest that melancholia demands a first-person subject position.  Rewriting the past Yet psychoanalytic theories of melancholia following from Freud repeatedly emphasise that melancholia precisely cannot be spoken in the first person. In this chapter, I focus on the figure of the female vampire in Vers la lumière in order to explore what it means to ‘write melancholia’ in the

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

remain in the paternal and protective domicile of childhood’ and can only reconcile leaving this sphere to marry an outsider if they ‘fancy’ their fathers are evil. 52 In using psychoanalytic theory to examine the Female Gothic’s subversive nature, scholars point to the heroine’s fantasy of paternal threats as reflective of a passive resistance to patriarchy. 53 This

in Gothic incest