The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

Introduction This essay discusses Red Cross museums as a medium of humanitarian communication. A long-neglected theme in public history and the historiography of humanitarianism, Red Cross museums today are vital agents in the movement’s work to communicate the values, missions, and historical achievements of Red Cross societies around the world. Local publics find those museums in the United States, the UK, or Germany – which has more than a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

tracks the much neglected history of Red Cross museums throughout the twentieth century, showing that the newer approach of public history may open a productive line of inquiry on the history of humanitarian communication. Finally, Dominique Marshall’s piece explores the history of the Canadian International Development Agency, examining and reflecting on the uses and impacts of its ‘Photo Library’. The four historical essays are sided by conversations with communication practitioners or image

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

An accomplished academic, collector, and long-time Red Cross volunteer, Professor Dr Rainer Schlösser is head of the Red Cross Museum of the Red Cross Chapter Fläming-Spreewald in Luckenwalde. He has directed the museum since 2000. Since 2006, he has also served as official spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany, a group connecting thirteen Red Cross museums across Germany. I met Rainer Schlösser in his office at the Red Cross Museum in Luckenwalde. After an extended and insightful tour through the museum we sat down to discuss his ideas and his work at the museum.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

national purity and tradition by ‘alien’ elements and ideologies – was addressed in the public history films and commemoration pictures examined by Roberta E. Pearson and Heidi Kenaga in this book, Blade Runner (1982), Total Recall (1990) and Memento (2000) demonstrate a more contemporary concern with the unsettled boundaries between reality and simulation in the constitution of remembered identity and experience. If

in Memory and popular film
The victims' struggle for recognition and recurring genocide memories in Namibia
Vilho Amukwaya Shigwedha

opinions on this topic. Responding to the idea of displaying the genocide skulls as museum objects, Albertina Nekongo, a former Public History student at the University of Namibia, offered the following sentiments: ‘It does not really matter to me if a museum is built to exhibit the genocide skulls … the skulls are unrelated to me … Moreover, skulls are just skulls … but I would not entertain to see human remains of my close relative displayed in a museum.’54 This remark suggests that displaying human bones in a museum is as good as slighting their dignity and

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

History becomes heritage in various ways. Artifacts become appropriated by particular historical agendas, by particular ideologies of preservation, by specific versions of public history, and by particular values about exhibition, design, and display. (Arjun Appadurai and Carol A. Breckenridge) 1

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
A war of extermination, grave looting, and culture wars in the American West
Tony Platt

Spanish teaching lazy Indians how to ‘work hard’ in the eighteenth century to pictures of happy tribal self-government today. The upbeat version of the ‘California Story’ as a place of entrepreneurial ingenuity and cutting-edge modernity numbs us to the state’s bloody history. This practice of ‘scrupulous forgetting’, to use German historian Jörg Wollenberg’s phrase, is echoed in California’s sanitized public history that erases its tragic past, turning profound injustices into a narrative of progress. In this respect, California echoes Turkey’s official amnesia about

in Human remains and identification
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

Telegraph (5 September 1997). 51 The Times (22 March 2007). 52 George F. Custen, Bio/Pics. How Hollywood Constructed Public History (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1992 ), p. 18. 53

in The British monarchy on screen