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The interest in aesthetics in philosophy, literary and cultural studies is growing rapidly. This book contains exemplary essays by key practitioners in these fields which demonstrate the importance of this area of enquiry. New aestheticism remains a troubled term and in current parlance it already comes loaded with the baggage of the 'philistine controversy' which first emerged in an exchange that originally that took place in the New Left Review during the mid-1990s. A serious aesthetic education is necessary for resisting the advance of 'philistinism'. Contemporary aesthetic production may be decentred and belonging to the past, but that is not a reason to underestimate what great works do that nothing else can. Despite well-established feminist work in literary criticism, film theory and art history, feminist aesthetics 'is a relatively young discipline, dating from the early 1990s'. The book focuses on the critical interrogation of the historical status of mimesis in the context of a gendered and racial politics of modernity. Throughout the history of literary and art criticism the focus has fallen on the creation or reception of works and texts. The book also identifies a fragmentary Romantic residue in contemporary aesthetics. The Alexandrian aesthetic underlies the experience of the 'allegorical'. 'Cultural poetics' makes clear the expansion of 'poetics' into a domain that is no longer strictly associated with 'poetry'. The book also presents an account of a Kantian aesthetic criticism, discussing Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Aesthetic Judgement and Critique of Judgement.

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An introduction
John J. Joughin and Simon Malpas

-critical formations. Ewa Ziarek interrogates the recent history of feminist aesthetics and in a post-culturalist reading which draws upon advances within post-colonialism and feminism, including the theories of female masquerade and colonial mimicry of Joan Riviere, Frantz Fanon and Homi Bhabha, she offers a reformulation of Adorno’s social history of mimesis in the context of a ‘gendered and racial politics of modernity’. In a reading which resonates powerfully with Docherty’s chapter Andrew Bowie reminds us that theory’s suspicion of identificatory modes of thinking and its

in The new aestheticism
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What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

' insistence that US racial politics and eastern European ethnic-minority questions stem from separate, incomparable historical conditions is not too far from how white Dutch or Nordic progressives exempt their nations from reckoning with racism and whiteness: dividing the world into zones where racism and colonial violence are ‘an issue’ and zones where they are not. What drives postsocialist racial exceptionalism, Imre argued further in 2014 while calling for a ‘postcolonial media studies in postsocialist Europe’, is how ethnic-majority narratives of national identity blur

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

of a global consumer culture that commercialises racialised gazes and desires into exotica (Gilroy 2000 ) and of the complex global imagination of ‘America’: indeed, African-American music and musicians were important for US cultural diplomacy during the Cold War (Von Eschen 2006 ), towards Non-Aligned Yugoslavia (Vučetić 2012 ) as well as the USSR. Sounds, songs, stars and genres deeply embedded in US racial politics, from jazz to Michael Jackson through Motown, were also cultural artefacts that entered Yugoslavia as symbols of Americanness, coolness and

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

whiteness in diaspora The Yugoslav region's worldwide diaspora communities, whether place-of-origin-based (‘zavičajni’), ethnonational or (post-)Yugoslav, encounter destination countries' formations of race and whiteness even as they reconfigure identities they know. Some destinations, like the USA, have unmissable, everyday racial politics, where migrants must try to understand the balance of interracial relations and determine how they, individually and collectively, might desire to be racialised or are racialised by others. In others (like Sweden or

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

African presence was nevertheless erased in a Soviet racial politics that ‘productively link[ed] Russianness to whiteness’ (Fikes and Lemon 2002 : 517) abroad. Soviet racial formations influenced, but did not fully overwrite, constructions of race, whiteness and modernity in state socialist eastern Europe: adaptation to Soviet ideology was less an exercise in unthinking conformity, more an uneasy balance between responding to domestic factors and averting the coercion awaiting (as Hungary 1956 and Czechoslovakia 1968 reminded Communists elsewhere) a

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Anna Greenwood

policy was sometimes selectively deployed. This shows, above all, how the British sought to manipulate their self-image in relation to the racial politics of the island, in ways that flexibly prioritised their own interests. Despite the fact that that the ZMA had originally been a British idea, and irrespective of the Association’s subsequent popularity and success, the Colonial Medical Service showed

in Beyond the state
Feminist aesthetics, negativity and semblance
Ewa Plonowska Ziarek

autonomy and the critical social function of art, such an approach would contest the historical separation not only between political and aesthetic spheres but also between gender and ‘the colour line’ fracturing these spheres from within, while remaining suspicious of their false reconciliation. Put in a different way, feminist aesthetics has to find new ways of mediation between the aesthetic autonomy of art and the sexual, racial politics of modernity without overcoming the productive tension between them. Rather than subsuming art by politics, this mediation should

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

effects of racism, were important influences for the urgent contribution provided by the writers of The Empire Strikes Back (Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies 1982 ) in their analysis of British racial politics in the 1970s. As Paul Giroy noted in the book’s concluding chapter, ‘Steppin’ out of Babylon – race class and autonomy’, they were writing at a time of populist, right-wing resurgence, economic downturn and structural unemployment (Gilroy 1982 : 275–276). At the close of the second decade of the twenty-first century we are at another such historical

in Race talk
Tarik Kochi

up and developed by Frantz Fanon ( 1968 ). In another sense, the hypocrisy of Hegel's position can be seen to continue today not simply at a level of global racial politics, but in the ideological non-recognition of particular states, political formations and forms of life. We can think of how in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries the dominant, global hegemonic power, the

in Recognition and Global Politics