Critical encounters between state and world

Recognition and Global Politics examines the potential and limitations of the discourse of recognition as a strategy for reframing justice and injustice within contemporary world affairs. Drawing on resources from social and political theory and international relations theory, as well as feminist theory, postcolonial studies and social psychology, this ambitious collection explores a range of political struggles, social movements and sites of opposition that have shaped certain practices and informed contentious debates in the language of recognition.

Nancy Fraser

MCK5 1/10/2003 10:25 AM Page 86 5 Recognition without ethics? Nancy Fraser For some time now, the forces of progressive politics have been divided into two camps. On one side stand the proponents of ‘redistribution’. Drawing on long traditions of egalitarian, labour, and socialist organising, political actors aligned with this orientation seek a more just allocation of resources and goods. On the other side stand the proponents of ‘recognition’. Drawing on newer visions of a ‘difference-friendly’ society, they seek a world where assimilation to majority or

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies
Meanings, Limits, Manifestations
Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick

1 Recognition and the International: Meanings, Limits, Manifestations Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick Over the past two decades, critical debates and insights within philosophy, sociology and political theory have focused on the concept of recognition. From interpersonal relationships of self and other, to multiculturalism, identity

in Recognition and Global Politics
Tarik Kochi

5 Recognition and Accumulation Tarik Kochi Introduction The latter years of the twentieth century saw the emergence of a number of very interesting reinterpretations of G.W.F. Hegel's moral and political philosophy in which the concept of ‘recognition’ ( Anerkennung ) was given pride of place

in Recognition and Global Politics
Greta Fowler Snyder

10 Recognition in the Struggle against Global Injustice Greta Fowler Snyder Introduction State-specific solutions are necessarily inadequate to the task of effectively addressing the many global issues that humans face today – environmental damage, the ravages of neo-liberalism, violence against

in Recognition and Global Politics
Emilian Kavalski and Magdalena Zolkos

8 The Recognition of Nature in International Relations Emilian Kavalski and Magdalena Zolkos We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly

in Recognition and Global Politics
Matthew S. Weinert

11 Recognition in and of World Society Matthew S. Weinert Why ‘recognition’? The term resonates differently and has distinctive implications depending on its use. The first is grammatical: to recognize something is to comprehend some

in Recognition and Global Politics
Volker M. Heins

4 Recognition, Multiculturalism and the Allure of Separatism Volker M. Heins In Charles Taylor's seminal writings, the revival of the nineteenth-century concept of ‘recognition’ was closely connected to the birth of ‘multiculturalism’ as a public policy and normative idea. This connection has

in Recognition and Global Politics
Robbie Shilliam

7 In Recognition of the Abyssinian General Robbie Shilliam I am an Abyssinian General. These are my troops. Do not cross this bridge. You see me lying down with cutlass in my hand? I will cut you if you cross. No plantation work at Lusignan today. Or tomorrow. Not here, nor anywhere in Demerara

in Recognition and Global Politics
Fiona Robinson

9 Paternalistic Care and Transformative Recognition in International Politics Fiona Robinson In this chapter, I address what Uma Narayan described in 1995 as ‘the self-serving collaboration between elements of colonial rights discourse and care discourse’ ( 1995 : 133). Narayan argues that, in

in Recognition and Global Politics