Working memories
Author: David Calder

Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space explores how street theatre transforms industrial space into postindustrial space. Deindustrializing communities have increasingly turned to cultural projects to commemorate industrial heritage while simultaneously generating surplus value and jobs in a changing economy. Through analysis of French street theatre companies working out of converted industrial sites, this book reveals how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. The book argues, firstly, that deindustrialization and redevelopment rely on the spatial and temporal logics of theatre and performance. Redevelopment requires theatrical events and performative acts that revise, resituate, and re-embody particular pasts. The book proposes working memory as a central metaphor for these processes. The book argues, secondly, that in contemporary France street theatre has emerged as working memory's privileged artistic form. If the transition from industrial to postindustrial space relies on theatrical logics, those logics will manifest differently depending on geographic context. The book links the proliferation of street theatre in France since the 1970s to the crisis in Fordist-Taylorist modernity. How have street theatre companies converted spaces of manufacturing into spaces of theatrical production? How do these companies (with municipal governments and developers) connect their work to the work that occurred in these spaces in the past? How do those connections manifest in theatrical events, and how do such events give shape and meaning to redevelopment? Street theatre’s function is both economic and historiographic. It makes the past intelligible as past and useful to the present.

Open Access (free)
The imaginary archaeology of redevelopment
David Calder

3 Excavation: the imaginary archaeology of redevelopment Vaulx-en-Velin, May 2012. I have reached the end of the line. I alight from the subway train at Vaulx-en-Velin La Soie, the ‘multimodal’ transit hub that since October 2007 has connected this far-flung eastern banlieue to Lyon city centre. Diffuse light from frosted skylights bathes the underground platform in a soft glow. Warm-toned woods and evenly spaced palm trees set this station apart from the older, workaday concrete models I left behind in Lyon and Villeurbanne. In the years following this visit

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Continuous theatre for a creative city
David Calder

Solga call the ‘creative city script’ as an official cultural and economic strategy; they hope to position Nantes as a European leader in architecture, design, new media, digital innovation, research, and the fine and performing arts.7 Crucial to this strategy is the redevelopment of the Ile de Nantes, the island in the Loire, just south of the city centre, that served as Nantes’ shipbuilding hub from the nineteenth century to the launch of the Bougainville. Much of the former shipyards has been converted into a park. Traces of the island’s industrial past remain

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Working memory
David Calder

urban and economic change. Bonnard’s reflection on the preservation of the TASE factory reveals much about the stakes of his company’s work, the tensions inherent in deindustrialization and redevelopment, and the issues that will recur throughout this book. Bonnard conveys urgency, even danger. The task at hand is not to preserve a corpse but to save a life, or rather a living connection between present and past congealed for the moment in the fragile structure of the factory itself. This temporal link establishes local identity that might persist despite

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Alternative pasts, sustainable futures
David Calder

, the towering metal stems of the lamps and the bench bend toward them gently, as if curious; less careful spectators cause the sculptures to jerk aggressively. In this concluding chapter I approach these two installations, Giraud’s Le murmure des plantes 2.0 and Fer à Coudre’s Eclosion floraferrique, because they exemplify contemporary French street theatre’s production of postindustrial space.3 Neither is attached to a specific urban or regional redevelopment project, but through their aesthetics, their work on space and time, and the mode of spectatorship they

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
The end of the dream
Simon Mabon

a challenge to future generations. The process of post-​war reconstruction –​albeit before the war has officially ended –​ provided the Asad regime with a further opportunity to ensure his survival. Recognising the need to attract foreign direct investment (FDI), Urban Law Renewal 10 allows for the mass confiscation of refugee property, offering areas for potential redevelopment and valuable urban real estate.22 Although some frame it as ‘reconstruction legislation’, the political dimensions are easily seen. Legislation prevents people from returning to their

in Houses built on sand
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

Garibaldi. Migrant and Neapolitan street vendors lost their licensed spots across the city, either because the spaces they worked in were destined for redevelopment, or because they didn’t have valid vendor licences, or because of accusations that they were breaking the law by selling contraband. In particular, migrant street vendors were subjected to intensified policing measures and municipal crackdowns. Despite repeatedly stating that he was pro-migrant rights, migrant vendors experienced the same scrutiny under de Magistris’ administration that they had historically

in Race talk
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia
Frances Tay

the war dead conjure for the settled Chinese minority? Batu Caves, 2002 On 11 November 2002, Liew Yew Kiew, eighty-nine, formerly a villager of Sungai Tua, Batu Caves, led a contingent of Chinese press, Chinese association members, and Quek Jin Teck, secretary-general of the Malaysian Chinese Cultural Society, to a clearing amidst the thick undergrowth. They arrived bearing eighteen ceramic urns, adorned with lion heads. They were there to retrieve the remains of the ‘9-1 Martyrs’ whose mass grave was threatened by state land redevelopment. Liew had witnessed the

in Human remains and identification
Mads Qvortrup

intellectual history of nationalism is too rarely acknowledged (Velkley 2002: 32). This is regrettable. The fact is that he – alongside Herder and Fichte – developed a model for: 1) how the emotional attachment to a nation could be generated; 2) how a redevelopment of the ancient doctrine of patriotism could be transformed into a new, powerful doctrine; 3) how this could be done in practice; and 4) how a doctrine of nationalism could perform the functions of civic religion in ancient Greece and Rome. Rousseau, as already noted, was not the only thinker to develop a case for

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau