Ben Jackson

12 The rhetoric of redistribution1 Ben Jackson Hobson, lecturing on economics last night on the BBC, referred to the revolution which had occurred in our society by the imposition of taxes upon wealth, & the heavy death duties which prevented it from being passed on. And D. [Lloyd George], looking at me significantly, pointed his finger to his own breast, meaning: I did it. (Lloyd George: a Diary by Frances Stevenson, entry for 29.10.1934, quoted in Clarke 1974: xxxiv) Introduction The historic distributive achievements of social democracy – the welfare state

in In search of social democracy
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

, in this issue, COVID-19 is perhaps most notable by its absence – this is itself the new normalcy, where the pandemic is reduced to allusions to remote research methods and included in research limitations. It is not yet clear whether the distanced collaborations enforced by the travel restrictions contribute to redistribution of authorial power when writing on humanitarianism, or simply a filtering of common hierarchies through new lenses. The articles in this issue offer a range of methodological and conceptual approaches to consider these questions. Ranging

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lachlan McIver, Maria Guevara, and Gabriel Alcoba

). Given the impact of national NTD programmes being suspended during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2013–16 ( Alswang et al. , 2021 ), such negative consequences for NTD control should have been anticipated. This could have entailed, for example, stockpiling and redistribution of existing supplies and technical development support for other manufacturers. Previous experiences of reallocation of resources in the context of a new emergency leading to worsening health access, care and outcomes

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

adversely affect the aid experience. Consequently, these biases also need to be considered in project design. Typical of many policy pronouncements following the 2008 global financial crisis, however, the World Bank finds it necessary to reject the need for significant political change or social redistribution ( World Bank, 2015 : 80). This is at a time when global inequality is at record levels and new forms of post-social servitude and abjection are appearing ( Lebaron and Ayers, 2013 ). As a practical illustration of the ontopolitics of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

, is eroding. Both the right and the left have come to see in these liberal mechanisms barriers to the realisation of their most desired preferences (more aggressive chauvinism, more effective redistribution). Politics at the national level in the West has been shocked back into life after decades of malaise. The insistent questions are no longer technocratic but substantive, with attitudes to ‘the other’ a pivotal part of these conversations globally. In 2018, Freedom House recorded its twelfth consecutive year of decline in freedom worldwide, with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

-protection policy. A second problematic aspect of the ‘data gift’ is the increased risk of real-life harm generated by cyber insecurity ( Sandvik and Raymond, 2017 ). While organisations optimistically proclaim that technology redistributes power ( OCHA, 2013 ) and that value-added information in itself constitutes relief, it is increasingly evident that new risks and harms stem from the adoption of humanitarian innovation and experimentation processes, particularly in relation to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Resilience and the Language of Compassion
Diego I. Meza

), ‘ Humanitarianism with a Neo-Liberal face: Vulnerability intervention as vulnerability redistribution ’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies , doi: 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1573661 . Sum , N-L. and Jessop , B. ( 2013 ), Towards a Cultural Political Economy: Putting Culture in its Place ( Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar ). Toscano , A. ( 2017 ), ‘ Mario Castaño Bravo, memoria de un líder incansable ’, CINEP , 29 November . UARIV ( 2021 ), Eventos: Víctimas por hecho victimizante , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

female interlocutors’ personal income is redistributed within kinship networks, who manages family resources and how women themselves benefit from the support of other family members. This approach, of course, draws inspiration from longstanding scholarship on the importance of kinship in the Middle East (cf. Joseph, 1994 , 2004 ) and the diversity and strength of ethnic, religious and regional groups in pre-war Syria ( Stevens, 2016 ). Before 2011, women cemented

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Reasonable tolerance

The idea of toleration as the appropriate response to difference has been central to liberal thought since Locke. Although the subject has been widely and variously explored, there has been reluctance to acknowledge the new meaning that current debates offer on toleration. This book starts from a clear recognition of the new terms of the debate, reflecting the capacity of seeing the other's viewpoint, and the limited extent to which toleration can be granted. Theoretical statements on toleration posit at the same time its necessity in democratic societies, and its impossibility as a coherent ideal. There are several possible objections to, and ways of developing the ideal of, reasonable tolerance as advocated by John Rawls and by some other supporters of political liberalism. The first part of the book explores some of them. In some real-life conflicts, it is unclear on whom the burden of reasonableness may fall. This part discusses the reasonableness of pluralism, and general concept and various more specific conceptions of toleration. The forces of progressive politics have been divided into two camps: redistribution and recognition. The second part of the book is an attempt to explore the internal coherence of such a transformation when applied to different contexts. It argues that openness to others in discourse, and their treatment as free and equal, is part of a kind of reflexive toleration that pertains to public communication in the deliberative context. Social ethos, religious discrimination and education are discussed in connection with tolerance.

Nancy Fraser

MCK5 1/10/2003 10:25 AM Page 86 5 Recognition without ethics? Nancy Fraser For some time now, the forces of progressive politics have been divided into two camps. On one side stand the proponents of ‘redistribution’. Drawing on long traditions of egalitarian, labour, and socialist organising, political actors aligned with this orientation seek a more just allocation of resources and goods. On the other side stand the proponents of ‘recognition’. Drawing on newer visions of a ‘difference-friendly’ society, they seek a world where assimilation to majority or

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies