Institutions and the challenges of refugee governance
Dalia Abdelhady

7 Dalia Abdelhady Media constructions of the refugee crisis in Sweden: institutions and the challenges of refugee governance In an article entitled ‘The Death of the Most Generous Nation on Earth’, American journalist James Traub (2016) claims that ‘The vast migration of desperate souls from Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere has posed a moral test the likes of which Europe has not faced since the Nazis forced millions from their homes in search of refuge. Europe has failed that test.’ Sweden stands out as an exception in Traub’s analysis due to the country’s generous

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Deterrence policies and refugee strategies
Martin Bak Jørgensen

4 Martin Bak Jørgensen Representations of the refugee crisis in Denmark: deterrence policies and refugee strategies When (then) Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen gave his New Year’s Address on 1 January 2016 he focused particularly on the high number of refugees and asylum seekers who came to Europe and Denmark in 2015.1 The number both pressed and challenged Denmark, he said and then continued: Let us be honest with each other – we are challenged: it challenges our economy when we have to spend many more billions on asylum seekers and refugees. Money that

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?
Author: Catherine Baker

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

Introduction In October 2016 the New York Review of Books published an article by International Rescue Committee President David Miliband titled ‘The Best Ways to Deal with the Refugee Crisis’. It began with a predictable target. US Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s claims about a ‘tremendous flow’ of Syrian refugees making their way to North America were based in ‘myth, not fact’, Miliband wrote ( Miliband, 2016 ). Not only that: they also openly belittled the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

of access that results in the ‘haves’ versus the ‘have nots’. She convincingly argues that this definition, developed in the West, does not capture the complexities and transient nature of refugees using digital technology. The current refugee crisis has witnessed the displacement of close to 70 million people worldwide ( UNHCR, 2019 ) due to political conflict, criminal violence and war. While the waves of migrants reaching the coast of southern Europe has attracted global attention, Australia

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

/jan/12/donald-trump-cut-funding-palestinian-refugees-middle-east-security (accessed 13 January 2018 ). Easton-Calabria , E. and Omata , N. ( 2018 ), ‘ Panacea for the Refugee Crisis? Rethinking the Promotion of “Self-Reliance” for Refugees ’, Third World Quarterly , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2018.1458301 . Enloe , C. ( 1991 ), ‘ “Womenandchildren”: Propaganda Tools of Patriarchy ’, in Bates , G. (ed.), Mobilizing Democracy: Changing the US Role in the Middle East ( Monroe, ME : Common

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

: Polity ). Evans , B. and Reid , J. ( 2013 ), ‘ Dangerously Exposed: The Life and Death of the Resilient Subject ’, Resilience , 1 : 2 , 83 – 98 . Gander , K. ( 2016 ), ‘ The Designers Trying to Help Victims of the Refugee Crisis by Building Apps and Shelters

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

Rohingya refugee crisis. In August 2018, Translators without Borders (TWB) surveyed a sample of refugees in the Kutupalong–Balukhali camp (407 respondents) to better understand their language and information needs ( Hasan, 2018 ). TWB found that language barriers and low access to media left many Rohingya refugees without the crucial information they needed to get support and make informed choices. Communication was made even more difficult by the fact that the Rohingya language lacks a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

). While NGOs lay claim to a ‘non-governmental’ status, direct action thrived when donor sovereignty was, paradoxically, still able to cast a shadow. Given the refugee crisis, few can today contemplate the wretched state of ‘official’ humanitarianism without some disquiet. Despite what we may wish or demand, however, it is unlikely that significant improvement will occur any time soon. But to then conclude that humanitarianism is dead would be a mistake. While autonomous international direct action lies buried in the rubble of the West’s urbicidal wars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

measures. By bringing together the two issues that more than any other mobilise public opinion, Rackete has also drawn attention to the complexity of the situation and to global interdependencies – for example to the fact that there is no ‘refugee crisis’, but rather a ‘crisis of global justice’ ( Rackete and Weiss, 2019 : 35). Furthermore, a call for civil disobedience might imply an elective affinity between rescuers and rescued. Arguably, the latter too practice civil disobedience by attempting to cross borders ( Celikates, 2019 ); while the disobedience of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs