Institutions and the challenges of refugee governance
Dalia Abdelhady

7 Dalia Abdelhady Media constructions of the refugee crisis in Sweden: institutions and the challenges of refugee governance In an article entitled ‘The Death of the Most Generous Nation on Earth’, American journalist James Traub (2016) claims that ‘The vast migration of desperate souls from Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere has posed a moral test the likes of which Europe has not faced since the Nazis forced millions from their homes in search of refuge. Europe has failed that test.’ Sweden stands out as an exception in Traub’s analysis due to the country’s generous

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Deterrence policies and refugee strategies
Martin Bak Jørgensen

4 Martin Bak Jørgensen Representations of the refugee crisis in Denmark: deterrence policies and refugee strategies When (then) Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen gave his New Year’s Address on 1 January 2016 he focused particularly on the high number of refugees and asylum seekers who came to Europe and Denmark in 2015.1 The number both pressed and challenged Denmark, he said and then continued: Let us be honest with each other – we are challenged: it challenges our economy when we have to spend many more billions on asylum seekers and refugees. Money that

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?
Author: Catherine Baker

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

Introduction In October 2016 the New York Review of Books published an article by International Rescue Committee President David Miliband titled ‘The Best Ways to Deal with the Refugee Crisis’. It began with a predictable target. US Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s claims about a ‘tremendous flow’ of Syrian refugees making their way to North America were based in ‘myth, not fact’, Miliband wrote ( Miliband, 2016 ). Not only that: they also

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

conceptualisation of the digital divide as a matter of access that results in the ‘haves’ versus the ‘have nots’. She convincingly argues that this definition, developed in the West, does not capture the complexities and transient nature of refugees using digital technology. The current refugee crisis has witnessed the displacement of close to 70 million people worldwide ( UNHCR, 2019 ) due to political conflict, criminal violence and war. While the waves of migrants reaching the coast of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

The RefuSHE initiative is a non-profit-making organisation with headquarters in Chicago. Its humanitarianism evolves around the protection and empowerment of women refugees through education and work. The American RefuSHE co-founder Anne Sweeney notes that the initiative ‘was born, to offer an innovative solution within the global refugee crisis, or a one-of-a-kind model for protection, empowerment, and peace-building in Kenya and beyond’ ( Rigou, 2018 ). The women

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/12/donald-trump-cut-funding-palestinian-refugees-middle-east-security (accessed 13 January 2018 ). Easton-Calabria , E. and Omata , N. ( 2018 ), ‘ Panacea for the Refugee Crisis? Rethinking the Promotion of “Self-Reliance” for Refugees ’, Third World Quarterly , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2018.1458301 . Enloe , C. ( 1991 ), ‘ “Womenandchildren”: Propaganda Tools of Patriarchy ’, in Bates , G. (ed.), Mobilizing Democracy: Changing the US Role in the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Brendan T. Lawson

refugee crisis in the country. Glasman (2020 : 232–3) explains that there were a series of fracture lines across humanitarian actors and institutions: between the Cameroonian state and NGOs and the UN system, between UN organisations and INGOs, between urgentists and developmentalists and between those with a refugee focus and those concerned with the wider population. To pacify these tensions, UNOCHA followed three steps: they gathered the humanitarian organisations into ten sectors and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

. Abu-Assab , N. ( 2017 ), ‘ Destabilising gender dynamics: Syria post-2011 ’, in J. Freedman , Z. Kivilcim , and N. O. Baklacıoglu (eds), A Gendered Approach to the Syrian Refugee Crisis ( London, New York : Routledge ), pp. 16 – 25

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
Aditya Sarkar, Benjamin J. Spatz, Alex de Waal, Christopher Newton, and Daniel Maxwell

exited from a context where they believed they were doing more good than harm – such as the Goma refugee crisis ( Terry, 2001 ) – there have always been plenty of other agencies willing to step in and fill the gap left behind, which simply removes those principled actors from the arena and replaces them with (presumably less principled) actors. But PM analysis likewise shines a new light on this issue as well – not simply the diversion of aid and funnelling it to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs