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Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

can be placed on or inside aid recipients’ bodies for many purposes, including tracking and protecting health, safety and nutrition. This may involve delivering or monitoring reproductive health, producing security and accountability through more efficient registration, or monitoring or delivering nutrition. I argue that, to unpack this co-production, it is necessary to look beyond technological innovation and subsequent processes of adoption and adaptation in the humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

at the same time at the very basis of any form of VAW and the outcome of VAW, an obstacle to the achievement of gender equality.3 In legal analysis great emphasis has been placed over time on discrimination on the basis of sex, which is often intertwined with other bases such as ethnicity, religion, age and sexual orientation. However, in investigating the phenomenon of violence, an aspect has not been explored sufficiently: violence may severely affect women’s health, and in particular reproductive health. As pointed out by the UN Committee on the Elimination of

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

of the disease over time.1 In my book, these elements have been the judgments of human rights courts and national courts, and the views of UN treaty bodies, related to specific aspects of the relationship between VAW on one hand, and the rights to health and to reproductive health on the other. It should be said that my analysis might seem limited – I looked into around seventy decisions. A database is not the purpose of this book, which aims to reflect on a precise relationship and analyse it using a medical metaphor to achieve a reconceptualisation of states

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
The prognosis
Sara De Vido

, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis has provided a sufficient descriptive framework for systematising my argument and has encouraged a reflection which has led me to the elaboration of a new concept in international law around which to construe states’ obligations. I started my analysis from the conviction that VAW always relates to the right to health and the right to reproductive health. I contended that the relationship is not merely a causal one, however, in the sense that VAW causes a violation of the rights to health and to reproductive health (what I called the

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

3 The treatment: re-conceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH Starting from the beginning: the nature of state obligations This chapter consists in the treatment, and it attempts to find an answer to the question which obligations states must abide by with regard to VAWH? There is often no univocal response – and hence a treatment – to a disease. However, the current legal instruments underestimate – to the point of not even mentioning women’s rights to health and to reproductive health – the point that focusing on health is a way, in considering

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

1 The anamnesis: ‘case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health The anamnesis, a two-dimensional approach The anamnesis mainly consists in case history. However, Hippocrates went beyond the mere identification of ‘symptoms’ or ‘earlier diseases,’ and included in the anamnesis his own experience, as far as it was pertinent.1 Hippocrates also ‘listened’ to patients, to discover their ‘personalities, dream, daily habits,’ in a process that resembled the modern ‘psycho-therapeutic interaction between the

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin and Steven Thompson

their battles for representation and improvement, but certain circumstances meant that the smaller scale of their campaigns was not necessarily a hindrance to their hopes of making progress. In particular, the maternalist politics pursued through the women’s sections of the Labour Party, and conducted in the sphere of local government, coincided with national concerns over maternity and reproductive health. The growing ‘toll of motherhood’ in the 1930s, in particular, led to significant efforts to improve maternity services and lessen maternal mortality and morbidity

in Disability in industrial Britain
Zuzana Jezerska

’s status in the region. These were: • institutionalizing national machineries; • facilitating equal participation of women in decision making; • improving the economic and labour market situation of women; • improving women’s health, including reproductive health and family planning services; • eliminating violence against women; • reducing the effects of environmental degradation on women and improving women’s role in environmental management; 173 174 CASE STUDIES • reducing the social costs of transition; • improving the situation of rural women; • addressing the

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?