Ben Jackson

12 The rhetoric of redistribution1 Ben Jackson Hobson, lecturing on economics last night on the BBC, referred to the revolution which had occurred in our society by the imposition of taxes upon wealth, & the heavy death duties which prevented it from being passed on. And D. [Lloyd George], looking at me significantly, pointed his finger to his own breast, meaning: I did it. (Lloyd George: a Diary by Frances Stevenson, entry for 29.10.1934, quoted in Clarke 1974: xxxiv) Introduction The historic distributive achievements of social democracy – the welfare state

in In search of social democracy
Open Access (free)
Negotiated Exceptions at Risk of Manipulation
Maelle L’Homme

context of instrumentalisation of humanitarian rhetoric, best illustrated by the Ethiopian government’s June 2021 announcement of a so-called ‘humanitarian ceasefire’ in Tigray, all the while continuing to hamper aid delivery. Apart from the intended or unintended negative side-effects presented so far, there is a number of ways in which humanitarian corridors have been blatantly manipulated in history. Occasionally, supply routes opened on humanitarian grounds have been abused by armed groups to smuggle weapons and munitions or recruit and repatriate troops. More often

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rhetoric and Identity in James Baldwin’s Revolution from Within
Davis W. Houck

Despite the proliferation of interest in James Baldwin across popular culture and the academy, few, if any, critical studies of his public oratory have been conducted. This is unfortunate and ironic—unfortunate because Baldwin was a marvelous orator, and ironic in that his preferred solution to what ailed whites and blacks as the Civil Rights movement unfolded was thoroughly rhetorical. That is, Baldwin’s racial rhetorical revolution involved a re-valuing of the historical evidence used to keep blacks enslaved both mentally and physically across countless generations. Moreover, for Baldwin the act of naming functions to chain both whites and blacks to a version of American history psychologically damaging to both. Three speeches that Baldwin delivered in 1963 amid the crucible of civil rights protest illustrate these claims.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
On James Baldwin and the Many Roles in Revolution
Nicholas Binford

Artists, scholars, and popular media often describe James Baldwin as revolutionary, either for his written work or for his role in the civil rights movement. But what does it mean to be revolutionary? This article contends that thoughtlessly calling James Baldwin revolutionary obscures and erases the non-revolutionary strategies and approaches he employed in his contributions to the civil rights movement and to race relations as a whole. Frequent use of revolutionary as a synonym for “great” or “important” creates an association suggesting that all good things must be revolutionary, and that anything not revolutionary is insufficient, effectively erasing an entire spectrum of social and political engagement from view. Baldwin’s increasing relevance to our contemporary moment suggests that his non-revolutionary tactics are just as important as the revolutionary approaches employed by civil rights leaders such as Malcolm X or Martin Luther King, Jr.

James Baldwin Review
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

I deal with two – to my mind – poorly understood journalistic practices in situations of extreme violence. The first is a type of lexical dependence – that is, how the language journalists typically use to describe war is borrowed from war-related rhetoric developed in other fields (humanitarian aid, diplomacy, or human rights advocacy), sometimes without being aware of it, and hence not always appreciating the relevance of such appropriation. The second is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Brendan T. Lawson

amalgamation that recognises the ‘everydayness’ of quantification, mediation and suffering ( Frosh, 2011 : 386). This account provides a counterpoint to some of the previous arguments concerning quantification by exploring the potentials of calculation to open up distinct, and morally desirable, spaces within humanitarianism. In doing so, we can see the potential of using the literature on ‘meaning’ (incorporating communication, representation, discourse and rhetoric) to explore

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

other than a nationalist social order, but it is in this era that the decisions and actions to move in this direction took hold and spread. Nationalism is a social and political construct that may have emerged in response to autocratic rule, in the name of ‘the people’, but it also created unintentional masses of displaced, stateless, and, later, illegal people who continue to be created and justified through a now familiar rhetoric and provocative nationalist discourse that present displaced people as a security or existential threat, revealing that ‘sovereignty is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

at least irrelevant, if not a hindrance, to the US. Trump’s consistent disregard for multilateralism and his authoritarian posturing towards allies and enemies alike now confirm the trend away from liberal internationalism that, despite cosmopolitan rhetoric, was already evident under the presidency of Barack Obama. This trend is not simply part of the secular fluctuation in American foreign policy between idealism and realism: its end is a rupture with the American exceptionalism essential to both traditions. The National Security

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Resilience and the Language of Compassion
Diego I. Meza

Víctimas, RUV) and self-entrepreneurship projects ( Aparicio, 2012 ). In addition, research indicates how waiting for government responses can lead to passivity and resignation or to forms of resistance ( Meza and Ciurlo, 2019 ; Schouw Iversen, 2021 ). However, little has been said about the standardisation of these practices. In this direction, I want to contribute to the debate by examining the intersection of these devices through the rhetoric of humanitarianism, particularly by proposing the case of psychosocial assistance to the displaced being based on the concept

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

politics informing each campaign?’ (12). As with any topic approached historically, this reveals both continuities and ruptures in the visual rhetoric of humanitarianism over time. While there are some general and characteristic features of humanitarian imagery, the collection as a whole makes it clear that there is no singular framing that constitutes the humanitarian lens. In her essay, ‘Sights of Benevolence’, Silvia Salvatici aptly makes this point

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs