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German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

in July 2018 boarded a Turkish Airlines flight from Gothenburg to Istanbul to prevent the deportation of a man to Afghanistan. 2 Arguably, such acts of solidarity are not new. Think, for example, of Lisa Fittko, who in 1940 and 1941 escorted many refugees, among them Walter Benjamin, across the Pyrenees from France to Spain ( Fittko, 2000 ). What is new, however, is the publicity and support these acts are garnering in Europe. In this essay I focus on one particular instance in 2019, in which an act of solidarity with migrants – a search and rescue (SAR) operation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

Introduction London, 10 September 2018 Since 2015, more than one and a half million people have traversed the Mediterranean, seeking asylum in Europe. The EU has been negotiating their screening and resettlement outside of Europe. European governments have closed some ports and borders to them. And neofascist groups from across Europe have rallied on the ground and online to prevent their entry. Thousands have died at sea. Multinational NGOs like Médecins Sans Frontières and Save the Children have carried out search-and-rescue missions. But it is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, on the impact on Palestinian refugees of US budget cuts under Donald Trump; José Luis Fiori, on the new security strategy of the US and the disavowal of liberal internationalism; David Rieff, on the legitimacy of humanitarian agencies in a changing political landscape; Mel Bunce, on humanitarian communications and ‘fake news’; Celso Amorim, on transformations in global governance and the influence of Southern states; Caroline Abu Sa’Da, on search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean; and Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa, on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response
Vincenzo Bollettino and Birthe Anders

destroyed, diverted, or programs have to be scaled down to minimise risk to personnel. However, whether in complex emergencies or in response to natural disasters, militaries often play an important role in humanitarian relief efforts, sometimes by providing search and rescue and airlift capabilities or by restoring damaged infrastructure. Indeed, in most of today’s crises, humanitarian organisations operate in the same environment as a range of military and non-state armed actors. Coordination is often easier in natural disaster settings than in conflict, as there is a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

his organisation’s experience: In the Mediterranean our search and rescue operations have been falsely accused of colluding with traffickers. It started as a report in the Italian media and then Defend Europe, the far-right group, hired their own boat to try and stop what we were doing. Breitbart released a video which purported to prove our collusion with traffickers but showed nothing of the kind. We had to fight this propaganda without many resources… (cited in ibid .: 8) These allegations suck up valuable resources, not least by requiring

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Elana Wilson Rowe

meeting did not produce a binding agreement as the previous two ministerial meetings had done (2011, Search and Rescue Agreement; 2013, Oil Spill Pollution and Response). Several initiatives under the 2013–​2015 chairmanship seemed to be The power politics of representation     45 aiming for high-​level agreement in various task forces, but failed to reach it within a two-​year chairmanship. Task forces are often established on areas of high political priority and have previously enjoyed rather quick progress to completed goals under each chairmanship. This probably

in Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

.g. search and rescue capacity), have also become subject to competing representations within other Arctic countries (for example, debating whether Russia’s actions represent Arctic militarisation or capacity building, not unlike other countries’ efforts, in preparation for a more open Arctic) (Conley and Rohloff, 2015; Pezard et al., 2017). It is also important to note that Russia’s increased engagement in Arctic issues and desire to be seen as a ‘play by the rules’ Arctic player was nonetheless seen to be selective, not comprehensive, even before the challenging

in Arctic governance
New stories on rafted ice
Elana Wilson Rowe

governance the Arctic (Young, 1985). Similar kinds of radar listening stations are still active along the Norwegian–​Russian border. At the same time, the performance of national ‘softer’ security functions was also an opportunity for cooperation and drew upon some of the same kinds of resources that could be applied in a hard security logic. For example, in 1988, Norway and the Soviet Union signed a bilateral agreement on search and rescue in the Barents Sea, which specified procedures and methods of cooperation in the event of maritime accidents (Archer, 1988). These

in Arctic governance
Jaewoo Choo

Afghanistan (as well as to the ancillary tasks of humanitarian aid and search-and-rescue missions), Uzbekistan now provides the staging ground for military action against any regional power threatening American objectives or allies. The United States is now positioned to support the governments of Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan as well as smaller Kyrgyzstan and even the Russian client-state Tajikistan in exchange for the favourable treatment of American interests, particularly the construction of energy pipelines and major infrastructure projects in the region

in Limiting institutions?
What contribution to regional security?
Panagiota Manoli

Establishment of the Black Sea Naval Cooperation Task Group, signed on 2 April 2001, made an important first step towards the institutionalisation of naval cooperation among all littoral states on the Black Sea. The agreement is intended to be an on-call force – christened BlackSeaFor – composed of naval units from the participating states (Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine).27 The purpose of BlackSeaFor is to foster cooperation in search and rescue operations, mine clearing operations and environmental activities, and to organise goodwill visits among the

in Limiting institutions?