Anne Marie Losonczy

Since the early 1990s, armed actors have invaded territories in the Chocó and Antioquia departments of Colombia, inhabited by Afro-Colombians and Indians whose collective rights in these territories had recently been legally recognised. Based on long-term fieldwork among the Emberá Katío, this article examines social, cosmological and ritual alterations and re-organisation around violent death. Following a national policy of post-conflict reparations, public exhumations and identifications of human remains reveal new local modes of understanding and administration. In particular, suicide, hitherto completely unknown to the Emberá, broke out in a multitude of cases, mostly among the youth. Local discourse attributes this phenomenon to the number of stray corpses resulting from the violence, who are transformed into murderous spirits which shamans can no longer control. The analysis focusses on the unprecedented articulation of a renewed eschatology, the intricate effects of an internal political reorganisation and the simultaneous inroad into their space of new forms of armed insurrectional violence. Thus the article will shed light on the emergence of a new transitional moral economy of death among the Emberá.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Death, landscape and power among the Duha Tuvinians of northern Mongolia
Benedikte Møller Kristensen

devils (chötgör1) thus polluting the land and its inhabitants. In their effort to avoid such pollution the Duha often, and during the last years increasingly so, conduct open-air funerals; especially in the case of deceased shamans and ‘ordinary’ people suffering a ‘non-ordinary’ death as a result of violence, drinking or magic. This chapter thus aims to explore the Duha concepts of proper and improper burial, including how their ‘return’ to open-air funerals may be conceived as an effort to (re)gain control over local bodies, lives and lands. 36 Benedikte Møller

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Beyond the witch trials
Owen Davies and Willem de Blécourt

decades of intermittent prosecution before decriminalisation, the debates that followed in the decade or so after, and to recognise the continued enactment of popular justice against suspected witches.1 Several collections of essays with an early modern focus have conscientiously included contributions concerning the continued belief in witchcraft and magic.2 Ronald Hutton, an eminent historian of early modern England has, in recent publications concerning paganism, contemporary witchcraft and shamanism, shown how skilled historians can apply their craft and range of

in Beyond the witch trials
Open Access (free)
Finn Stepputat

the rise and fall of Soviet state regulation of dead bodies, this chapter analyses how the Duha have perceived and dealt with the state’s claims on their dead bodies and the implied nationalisation of a landscape that was animated and managed through the Duha’s open-air burials. Families have had to navigate between the moral claims of the state, the shamans and the (agentive) corpses in a post-Soviet context where the Duha see their lives as increasingly marginalised and unprotected, as evidenced by the rising number of unnatural deaths. Christophe Robert explores

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
The early films of John Marshall and Timothy Asch
Paul Henley

the second expedition that fall into this category: A Man Called Bee , which offers a portrait of Chagnon in the field, and The Ax Fight , a particularly significant work that I consider later in this chapter. The only other longer film in the Asch-Chagnon Yanomamɨ canon is Magical Death , a solo work shot in 1970 by Chagnon, showing a group of shamans taking mind-altering drugs to enable them to enter the world of the spirits. 21

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

research of an academic consultant anthropologist. This was The Shaman and His Apprentice , based on the work of Graham Townsley among the Yaminahua of Peruvian Amazonia and directed by Howard Reid, who held an anthropology doctorate from Cambridge and had first entered television as a researcher on the Worlds Apart strand. 8 The same overall pattern was repeated in later series of the Under the Sun strand, as series producers

in Beyond observation
Sustainability in Kim Stanley Robinson’s Science in the Capital trilogy
Chris Pak

shadow of the future made all the difference’ 163 images of the past and future, as is attested by his alternate history about a world where the European population is eradicated by the Black Death, The Years of Rice and Salt (2003), and his recent prehistoric novel, Shaman: A Novel of the Ice Age (2013). The images of the past and of the future in these works of sf are historical constructs that tell us more about their contemporary moment than they do about either the past or the future. Robinson has long been concerned with sustainable and unsustainable futures

in Literature and sustainability
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

, record nos. 1792 (Samond), 1795 (Joan Gibson), and 1793 (Alice Bust). 27 Wolfgang Behringer, Shaman of Oberstdorf: Chonrad Stoeckhlin and the Phantoms of the Night , trans. H.C. Erik Midelfort (Charlottesville, VA: Virginia University Press, 1998; orig. Chonrad Stoeckhlin und die Nachtschar: eine Geschichte aus der frühen Neuzeit

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Paul Henley

present a series of scenes of everyday life of the Udege. Among the most memorable scenes are a marriage negotiation, the total quarantining of a mother on her own during the period that she is giving birth, various shamanic performances and a remarkable sequence involving the hunting of a bear. But in some ways the most remarkable of all are the quiet scenes around the village, of mothers cradling their babies, men chatting and smoking their pipes, and children constructing their toys. No doubt based on the long-standing prior relationship developed by Arsenev with the

in Beyond observation
Regnar Kristensen

Anthropology PhD series 68. Krmpotich, C., J. Fontein and J. Harries, 2010, ‘Preface’, Journal of Material Culture 15(4): 371–84. Special Issue: The Substance of Bones: The Emotive Materiality and Affective Presence of Human Remains. Lomnitz, C., 2005, Death and the Idea of Mexico (New York: Zone Books). Lydia C., 1975, El Monte (Florida: New House Publishers). Malvido, E., 2005, ‘Crónicas de la Buena Muerte a la Santa Muerte en México’, Arqueología Mexicana 13(76): 20–7. Taussig, M., 1987, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (Chicago: Chicago University Press). Turner

in Governing the dead