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The effects of gender, households and ethnicity
Jacqueline O’Reilly
,
Mark Smith
, and
Paola Villa

Social reproduction of youth labour market inequalities 13 The social reproduction of youth labour market inequalities: the effects of gender, households and ethnicity Jacqueline O’Reilly, Mark Smith and Paola Villa Introduction Young people have been disproportionately hit by the economic crisis. In many  European countries, unemployment rates have increased faster for youth  than for prime age groups (O’Reilly et al., 2015). Vulnerability to the risks of poverty and precarious employment has been compounded by ­increasing  economic inequalities and the rise

in Making work more equal
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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

sub-prime conditions of the South by optimising its social reproduction. Having devoured, since the 1970s, the last areas of economic and institutional autonomy still outside of itself ( Sloterdijk, 2013 ), other than profitably recycle the precarity it now produces in abundance, so to speak, late-capitalism has no other future. Incorporating the Wired Slum For decades, the global South’s huge informal economies have dwarfed conventional economic activity ( Dunaway, 2014 ). Enabled by connectivity, the long downturn has

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis
,
Luisa Enria
,
Sharon Abramowitz
,
Almudena-Mari Saez
, and
Sylvain Landry B. Faye

kinds of intermediaries navigating the response ( Vigh, 2006 ). These three ‘acts of resistance’ also demonstrate the complex political processes and the specific dynamics of compromise underpinning the social reproduction of the Ebola response at local level. They show the crucial need to pay attention to the positionalities of all interlocutors involved in these encounters, including self-reflexive attention to one’s own position (as researcher or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Jane Humphries

11 Plague, patriarchy and ‘girl power’ Jane Humphries Introduction The inspiration for this chapter comes from an earlier contribution, written with Jill Rubery in 1984, which surveyed theories of social reproduction and its relationship to the economy. We argued that the family, notwithstanding its extensive responsibilities for reproducing, training and socialising future workers, had not been established as an interesting, central and dynamic variable for ­economic analysis (Humphries and Rubery, 1984). Instead, across the whole spectrum of theoretical

in Making work more equal
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War, Debt, and Colonial Power
Tim Di Muzio
and
Richard H. Robbins

, gold and silver—the main monetary sources coveted by the Europeans—were more likely to be used in decoration for status than as a medium of exchange to be accumulated or invested. In a way, this fact demonstrated that the European fascination with gold and silver as the only “real” money was little more than a socially constructed fetish—albeit, an extremely powerful one. In other words, preconquest populations had established methods and rituals of social reproduction not premised upon capitalist markets and the accumulation of (metallic) money as an end in itself

in Debt as Power
Intimacy and the ‘noikokyrio’
Ilektra Kyriazidou

austerity. In the following section, I ethnographically approach the way their experiences and feelings derive from the changes in the social reproduction of livelihoods in austere times and how these create precarious conditions for them. 1 The next two sections then examine how these conditions shape forms of collective intimacy and distinct relations of solidarity and antagonism between the

in Affective intimacies
Introduction and overview
Damian Grimshaw
,
Colette Fagan
,
Gail Hebson
, and
Isabel Tavora

discrimination, gender inequalities in domestic labour, and the interplay of household and workplace power relations. Three insights are fundamental for our focus here. Firstly, feminist socio-economics demonstrates that the interaction between the spheres of production and social reproduction is central to the gendered structuring of labour market segmentation (Folbre, 1994; Humphries and Rubery, 1984). Early labour market segmentation theory usefully veered off to the demand side in a rejection of neoclassical economists’ assumed supplyside logic, but failed to revisit the

in Making work more equal
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War, National Debt, and the Capitalized State
Tim Di Muzio
and
Richard H. Robbins

, but constituted in social struggles that simultaneously 24 Debt as Power open up and close down political prospects. But an antiteleological view, skeptical of progressive or linear renderings of history, does not mean that history is absent human logic and rational pursuits.1 As Weatherford has argued, “every culture organizes life around a few simple principles, activities and beliefs” (1997: 8). Without wanting to minimize other aspects of human endeavor, in capitalist culture, life and social reproduction are largely organized, we contend, around the logic of

in Debt as Power
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author:

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

The dualist and complex role of the state in Spanish labour and employment relations in an age of ‘flexibility’
Miguel Martínez Lucio

and construction sectors have also been prone to higher levels of outsourcing and temporary contracting that have created a more precarious experience for migrant workers and the organisation of that employment. In addition, the unemployment rate in the past few years for immigrant communities has regularly been above 40 per cent. Hence any discussion of the labour market needs to account for the complex and sometimes contradictory roles of social reproduction (Humphreys and Rubery, 1984). The understanding of the role of the state in this regard in relation to

in Making work more equal