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Nineteenth-century literary culture and the southern settler colonies

This collection brings together for the first time literary studies of British colonies in nineteenth-century Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Drawing on hemispheric studies, Indigenous studies, and southern theory to decentre British and other European metropoles, the collection offers a latitudinal challenge to national paradigms and traditional literary periodisations and canons by proposing a new literary history of the region that is predicated less on metropolitan turning points and more on southern cultural perspectives in multiple regional centres from Cape Town to Dunedin. With a focus on southern orientations, southern audiences, and southern modes of addressivity, Worlding the south foregrounds marginal, minor, and neglected writers and texts across a hemispheric complex of southern oceans and terrains. Drawing on an ontological tradition that tests the dominance of networked theories of globalisation, the collection also asks how we can better understand the dialectical relationship between the ‘real’ world in which a literary text or art object exists and the symbolic or conceptual world it shows or creates. By examining the literary processes of ‘worlding’, it demonstrates how art objects make legible homogenising imperial and colonial narratives, inequalities of linguistic power, textual and material violence, and literary and cultural resistance. With contributions from leading scholars in nineteenth-century literary and cultural studies, the collection revises literary histories of the ‘British world’ by arguing for the distinctiveness of settler colonialism in the southern hemisphere, and by incorporating Indigenous, diasporic, settler, and other southern perspectives.

Open Access (free)
Settler emigration, the voyage out, and shipboard literary production
Fariha Shaikh

This chapter explores the spatialising methodologies of shipboard periodicals produced on three ships as they voyaged between Britain and Australia across the oceanic expanses of the southern hemisphere in the mid-nineteenth century: the Sobraon , the Somersetshire , and the True Briton . By the 1860s, newspapers produced on board the ship by passengers between Britain and the Antipodes were a regular affair: fair copies of newspapers were produced by hand and distributed around the ship, or, if the ship carried a printing press, newspapers were produced at

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Southern worlds, globes, and spheres
Sarah Comyn and Porscha Fermanis

Linked by the histories, geographies, and legacies of ‘imperial desire’, the countries and peoples of the southern hemisphere have long been shaped by their approximate otherness. 1 Defined and redefined by shifting European cartographic visions of unknown and unknowable lands inspiring exploration, discovery, conquest, and colonisation from at least the sixteenth century onwards, the qualities of distance and difference ascribed to those southern topographies by a northern gaze have more recently been remapped on to the south as an ‘indexical category’ and

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

according to northern conventions. 1 As Worlding the South explores, southern hemisphere histories are threaded through with many tenuous and yet still tenacious human conjunctions like the Pequod ’s – conjunctions often realised in or crystallised through maps, books, letters, panoramas, and other kinds of inscription and installation. These verbal, textual, and cartographic networks the book’s contributors study in abundant, fascinating detail. As against the monolithic constructs of empire and nation of much nineteenth- and twentieth-century colonial history, the

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Antipodean life as a comparative exercise
Sarah Comyn

the ‘antipodean imagination’ and its southern ‘doubles’ had for how the southern hemisphere was imagined, conceived, mocked, and celebrated by the poetry, fiction, parodies, letters, and illustrated articles published by Australian newspapers in the second half of the nineteenth century. While Giles uses the perspective offered by a ‘comparative consciousness’ to frame his analysis of how American literature adopts and adapts an ‘antipodean aspect’ from Australasia, this chapter will instead focus its attention on how this ‘antipodean aspect’ animated discussions

in Worlding the south
An unexpected text in an unexpected place
Michelle Elleray

convert’s faith was assessed. Taking the insights gleaned from the episode at the West India Docks and applying them to Kiro’s status within British evangelical circles, we need to ask how Kiro’s textual production in missionary publications likewise shapes him to the LMS’s ends, and where we might read Kiro as exceeding or challenging this disciplinary oversight. We know of Kiro’s arrival and reception in England because upon his return to the southern hemisphere he told his fellow Rarotongans about that moment, and a British missionary captured the account on paper

in Worlding the south
Globes, panoramas, fictions, and oceans
Peter Otto

1824 at the Leicester Square Panorama, perhaps in the foyer of that building. But it was the first full-scale panorama of Sydney and as such played an important part in shaping popular perceptions of the Antipodes and, to that extent, also of the southern hemisphere. It was so successful that when ‘A View of the Town of Sydney’ closed, Burford almost immediately offered a second full-scale panoramic view of the Antipodes, this time ‘A View of Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, and the Surrounding Country’, based again on drawings by Earle. The word ‘panorama’ can

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Race, class, and poetry in a South American colony
Jason Rudy, Aaron Bartlett, Lindsey O'Neil, and Justin Thompson

situate the colony in relation to Australia, the United States, and Great Britain, specifically in racialised terms. Our chapter begins with an overview of Australia’s late-century labour crisis, which precipitated Lane’s migration scheme. We turn then to the Cosme Monthly and its complex negotiations of race and class via poetry and song. Australian labour and the vision of Paraguay William Lane was an English-born immigrant to Australia, arriving in Brisbane in 1885. Among the few possessions he brought with him to the southern hemisphere were copies of Marx

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

. 49–76; D. Denoon, Settler Capitalism: The Dynamics of Dependent Development in the Southern Hemisphere (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983); D. Stasiulis and N. Yuval-Davis, Unsettling Settler Societies: Articulations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Class (London: Sage, 1995); R. Weitzer, Transforming Settler States: Communal Conflict and Internal Security in Northern Ireland and Zimbabwe (Berkeley

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Relational reflexivity in the ‘alternative’ food movement
Jonathan Murdoch and Mara Miele

Euros (EFTA 2002). chap 7 13/8/04 4:17 pm Page 169 A new aesthetic of food? 169 The European Fair Trade Association (EFTA) began in the early 1960s when Oxfam UK decided to create an alternative trading channel through which products from deprived regions in southern hemisphere countries could be marketed in ways that were of primary benefit to the producers. Parallel initiatives were established in other European countries, so that by the 1980s there was a profusion of competing schemes. Products were sold within the alternative channels through accredited

in Qualities of food