Projects like the SMD-funded retinopathy screening trials reflected the British state's growing engagement with diabetes during the 1980s. In that specific instance, the DHSS's hopes for generating organisational guidance for the NHS were disappointed. Central state interest in diabetes management, however, remained undimmed, and much more extensive standards for diabetes care would be produced by the new millennium. The work of elite practitioners and specialists proved integral to maintaining state interest in both

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
The (un)predictability of modern consumption

chap 2 13/8/04 4:13 pm Page 38 2 Standards of taste and varieties of goodness: the (un)predictability of modern consumption Jukka Gronow Introduction Very broadly speaking, there are three alternative understandings of the relationship between an object and its individual user. First, the value of an object is inherent to that object’s use in its capacity for satisfying its user’s needs or functions. Second, value is based on the individual’s subjective evaluation of the object in question, regarding its utility, capacity to give pleasure, etc. The third

in Qualities of food
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Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

humanitarian emergency or humanitarian setting becomes viewed as distinct from everyday practice and its accepted standards. There is also the other question: why does it persist? It is a lot easier if you don’t have to do the same things you do in normal practice. Unfortunately, many people find that attractive. Medicine is highly regulated, more and more regulated, more and more accountable, and in a humanitarian setting you hear people saying, ‘I just want to go and treat patients in need

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

also now questioned. In separating itself from the failures of the past, humanitarian innovation problematises the concerted attempts since the 1990s to professionalise the aid system, especially the numerous moves to standardise humanitarian engagement through behavioural codes, ground rules, technical guidelines and performance benchmarking ( Fiori et al ., 2016 ). Reflecting late-capitalism’s disdain for independent standards and autonomous expertise, side-lining humanitarian professionalism can be seen as a necessary condition for the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Building High-tech Castles in the Air?

being either poor or inaccurate. Therefore, at all times, there needs to be a careful eye on the documentation standards expected and the standards delivered during acute humanitarian disasters. In the longer term, records can be perused and interpreted; however, in the shorter term, when coordinating cells need fast daily data to help manage resources, immediately accessible accurate information is paramount. Maintaining this standard and enforcing it in a field hospital is one of many challenges

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Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation

Introduction I began to reconsider my opinion of humanitarian architecture on a wet November day in Venice, as rain lashed down on the city and darkness had just fallen. At the time, I was visiting the 2016 architecture Biennale, which had the theme ‘Reporting from the Front’: a phrase chosen by director Alejandro Aravena to encapsulate the way that architecture is ‘an endeavour that has to tackle many fronts, from guaranteeing very concrete, down-to-earth living standards

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

Sphere Handbook is a key reference point and identifies minimum standards for the field. It reinforces the importance of communicating ‘in languages, formats and media that are easily understood, respectful and culturally appropriate for different members of the community, especially vulnerable or marginalized groups’ ( Sphere Association, 2018 : 63). Providing ‘interpreters and translators if needed’ is also identified as a key action for sharing information with

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Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation

standards and humanitarian charter to which the system holds itself accountable ( ICRC, 2016 ; Sphere Project, 2016) – for example, in a health-programme response the use of specialist prophylactic medication, or the use of protective apparel for children, the efficacy of which has not been tested for use in that application or for that specific risk group. The sector has been hesitant to adopt programme-impact modelling to explore the potential of and flaws in innovative

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

international humanitarian agencies ( Murphy, 2017 ). Evacuation to a safer country is perhaps the ultimate in reducing someone’s vulnerability. The GPR includes a chapter on ‘evacuation, hibernation, remote management programming and return’, and evacuation is part of the standard toolkit for staff security, particularly expatriate staff security. Almost all major international humanitarian agencies have at some point used remote management, which

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Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

features of human groups, (anthropometry) on the assumption that the body can divulge a wide range of important information. By examining physical shape and comparing this to a standard normal distribution, anthropometry identifies abnormal body sizes and suboptimal diets – a process that relies on problematic notions of a ‘normal’ (Western) body. Scott-Smith (2013) incisively argues that the MUAC tape remains a top-down mechanism: ‘It has most value for the distributor, not

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs