Catherine Akurut

, M. ( 2019 ), ‘ Healing through Storytelling: Indigenising Social Work with Stories , The British Journal of Social Work , 49 : 6 , 1472 – 90 . Dolan , C. ( 2009 ), ‘ Nobody is Immune: Gender against Men ’, press release, 3 June , for premier of Refugee Law Project documentary , Gender against

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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The computer game as fictional form
Author: Barry Atkins

This book is dedicated to the study of computer games in terms of the stories they tell and the manner of their telling. It applies practices of reading texts from literary and cultural studies to consider the computer game as an emerging mode of contemporary storytelling. The book contains detailed discussion of narrative and realism in four of the most significant games of the last decade: ‘Tomb Raider’, ‘Half-Life’, ‘Close Combat’, and ‘Sim City’. It recognises the excitement and pleasure that has made the computer game such a massive global phenomenon.

Open Access (free)
Reading Half-Life
Barry Atkins

culture – that one is missing the irony, has failed to note the knowing nudge and wink, and should approach the text on its own terms. And yet Half-Life has been seen as setting something of a benchmark in game-fiction history, setting a gold standard of both ‘storytelling’ and ‘realism’ that subsequent game-fictions have been measured against. The game’s developers have certainly foregrounded this aspect of the experience, as the following promotional text taken from the publisher’s website demonstrates: Throughout the game, both friends and foes behave in

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

_Mistry_05_Ch5 150 9/6/04, 4:15 pm Family Matters 151 intrinsic concern with the Parsi community, it is nevertheless clearly continuing the investigation of the interconnected spaces of a multitudinous nation, and the intersubjective processes of storytelling that lies at the heart of Mistry’s oeuvre. Its cast of characters includes a secular Hindu who holds out against the excesses of the zealots in his own religion, a Muslim shop worker who drinks beer with his employer, and – for a while at least – a Parsi who is determined to do his best for his family within a

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Reading Tomb Raider
Barry Atkins

that Tomb Raider can be ‘read’ as fiction, chap2.p65 29 13/02/03, 16:36 30 More than a game and as self-conscious fiction in which serious play is made not just in game terms, but in terms that literary critics would recognise as play with the possibilities and limitations of storytelling. Some aspects of this self-consciousness, it is demonstrated here, are the result of what might be termed deliberate ‘authorial’ intention or design, and include (but sometimes go beyond) mere parody and pastiche. Potentially more interesting formal characteristics emerge

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Author: Peter Morey

Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.

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Living with scandal, rumour, and gossip

This book illuminates the personal experience of being at the centre of a media scandal. The existential level of that experience is highlighted by means of the application of ethnological and phenomenological perspectives to extensive empirical material drawn from a Swedish context. The questions raised and answered in this book include the following: How does the experience of being the protagonist in a media scandal affect a person’s everyday life? What happens to routines, trust, and self-confidence? How does it change the basic settings of his or her lifeworld?

The analysis also contributes new perspectives on the fusion between interpersonal communication that takes place face to face, such as gossip and rumours, and traditional news media in the course of a scandal. A scandal derives its momentum from the audiences, whose engagement in the moral story determines its dissemination and duration. The nature of that engagement also affects the protagonist in specific ways. Members of the public participate through traditional oral communication, one vital aspect of which is activity in digital, social forums.

The author argues that gossip and rumour must be included in the idea of the media system if we are to be able to understand the formation and power of a media scandal, a contention which entails critiques of earlier research. Oral interpersonal communication does not disappear when new communication possibilities arise. Indeed, it may be invigorated by them. The term news legend is introduced, to capture the entanglement between traditional news-media storytelling and oral narrative.

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Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

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Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

This chapter highlights the ways diasporas form as a collectively identified community despite their dispersal to multiple sites and in the Caribbean case, multiple nations of origin. These communities are neither homogeneous nor innate; they do a lot of work to construct boundaries around themselves and in the case of the Mavericks Cricket and Social Club (MCSC) that work involves liming to recreate a sense of home. Liming is a uniquely Caribbean expression that captures the practice of socializing, listening to music, playing and watching games of cricket and dominoes, and engaging in spirited rounds of antiphonic storytelling in native Patois languages and various English accents. This chapter explores these tactics used by MCSC members to create a sense of familiarity, solidarity, security, and comfort in a racist society; to celebrate blackness and masculinity; and to assuage the fear of infirmity and mortality. Through a focus on club members’ activities before, during and after games, the chapter shows how they mark themselves as part of various bounded groups: Blacks, Afro-Caribbeans, and also a local, Canadian community.

in Sport in the Black Atlantic