Arjun Claire

wearying of témoignage . Different conceptions of témoignage among the various MSF operational sections, anxieties about blurring of its medical identity as well as concerns around instrumentalisation of its voice and the risk of losing operational access have all combined to remove the moral and political edge of témoignage . With limited appetite for sweeping political statements, témoignage has been recast as a storytelling trope, where carefully

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

). Professional museum critics frequently registered their enthusiasm for the museum’s exhibits. As one critic put it, Givenwilson had made the museum a ‘thing of wonder’ and told ‘a story that is most effective because it appeals to the heart throughout the story-telling picture’ ( Rainey, 1926 ). The National Association of American Museums, admitting the museum in 1923, praised it as an ‘important link in museum work, because it represented the practical bond between the public

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Catherine Akurut

, M. ( 2019 ), ‘ Healing through Storytelling: Indigenising Social Work with Stories , The British Journal of Social Work , 49 : 6 , 1472 – 90 . Dolan , C. ( 2009 ), ‘ Nobody is Immune: Gender against Men ’, press release, 3 June , for premier of Refugee Law Project documentary , Gender against

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Stories from the frontline of the NHS

Healthcare aims to be patient-centred but a large gap remains between the fine words and the reality. Care often feels designed for the convenience of the organisations that deliver it, and not enough around patients and their families, or even around the frontline staff who provide it. Why does this happen? What does it feel like? What can be done about it? This book stimulates reflection on these questions by listening closely to those at the frontline. It provides accounts from patients, carers and healthcare professionals who are patients about what it’s like when services get it right, and wrong, from birth up to the end of life. Quite simply, we want to draw upon the power of storytelling – which is increasingly valued as a tool for learning – to help policymakers and practitioners to understand how to deliver better care. We also hope to enlighten the general reader about how they might go about navigating “the system” while it remains imperfect. There is a growing literature of first-person accounts from patients and from healthcare professionals. This book differs by providing a collection of narratives of experiences of the NHS in England to paint a rich and varied picture. Alongside these narratives we provide some international context, and an overview of the history of moves towards a more patient-centred approach to care. We present the theory and practice of storytelling in the context of healthcare. We also seek to help the reader to draw out the practical learning from the individual accounts.

Open Access (free)
The computer game as fictional form
Author: Barry Atkins

This book is dedicated to the study of computer games in terms of the stories they tell and the manner of their telling. It applies practices of reading texts from literary and cultural studies to consider the computer game as an emerging mode of contemporary storytelling. The book contains detailed discussion of narrative and realism in four of the most significant games of the last decade: ‘Tomb Raider’, ‘Half-Life’, ‘Close Combat’, and ‘Sim City’. It recognises the excitement and pleasure that has made the computer game such a massive global phenomenon.

Open Access (free)
Reading Half-Life
Barry Atkins

culture – that one is missing the irony, has failed to note the knowing nudge and wink, and should approach the text on its own terms. And yet Half-Life has been seen as setting something of a benchmark in game-fiction history, setting a gold standard of both ‘storytelling’ and ‘realism’ that subsequent game-fictions have been measured against. The game’s developers have certainly foregrounded this aspect of the experience, as the following promotional text taken from the publisher’s website demonstrates: Throughout the game, both friends and foes behave in

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Naomi Chambers and Jeremy Taylor

the end of life. Quite simply, we want to draw on the power of storytelling – increasingly valued as a tool for learning – to help practitioners understand how to deliver better care. There is a growing literature of first-person accounts both from patients and from healthcare professionals. This book differs by providing a collection of narratives, from a variety of viewpoints and stages in life, to paint a rich and varied picture. Alongside these narratives we provide some context: an overview of the history, theory and evidential underpinnings

in Organising care around patients
Open Access (free)
Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

_Mistry_05_Ch5 150 9/6/04, 4:15 pm Family Matters 151 intrinsic concern with the Parsi community, it is nevertheless clearly continuing the investigation of the interconnected spaces of a multitudinous nation, and the intersubjective processes of storytelling that lies at the heart of Mistry’s oeuvre. Its cast of characters includes a secular Hindu who holds out against the excesses of the zealots in his own religion, a Muslim shop worker who drinks beer with his employer, and – for a while at least – a Parsi who is determined to do his best for his family within a

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Reading Tomb Raider
Barry Atkins

that Tomb Raider can be ‘read’ as fiction, chap2.p65 29 13/02/03, 16:36 30 More than a game and as self-conscious fiction in which serious play is made not just in game terms, but in terms that literary critics would recognise as play with the possibilities and limitations of storytelling. Some aspects of this self-consciousness, it is demonstrated here, are the result of what might be termed deliberate ‘authorial’ intention or design, and include (but sometimes go beyond) mere parody and pastiche. Potentially more interesting formal characteristics emerge

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Author: Peter Morey

Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.