Open Access (free)
Understanding the violence of the benevolent welfare state in Norway
Nerina Weiss

11 Nerina Weiss The trauma of waiting: understanding the violence of the benevolent welfare state in Norway Bisrat, a refugee from Eritrea, was granted asylum in Norway after a relatively short waiting period of ten months. However, it took another two years before he was settled in a municipality. Asked about how he experienced his time in the reception centre after he was granted asylum, Bisrat answered as follows: It completely changed my behaviour. It is difficult when you have to spend three years of your life waiting for something. It is a very expensive

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

them in being able to respond to these things themselves. In Uganda, for example, they now have huge experience with managing Ebola. In my professional lifetime, I have seen the capacity of disaster-prone countries increase enormously. The need, certainly around earthquakes and trauma responses, for teams from Western Europe to go to disaster-prone countries has clearly gone down and is going down as it should. If we look at the Nepal earthquake, there was very little

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin and the Ethics of Trauma
Mikko Tuhkanen

This essay proposes that we turn to James Baldwin’s work to assess the cost of, and think alternatives to, the cultures of traumatization whose proliferation one witnesses in contemporary U.S. academia. Beginning with some recent examples, the essay briefly places these cultures into a genealogy of onto-ethics whose contemporary forms arose with the reconfiguration of diasporic histories in the idioms of psychoanalysis and deconstructive philosophy in 1990s trauma theory. Baldwin speaks to the contemporary moment as he considers the outcome of trauma’s perpetuation in an autobiographical scene from “Notes of a Native Son.” In this scene—which restages Bigger Thomas’s murderous compulsion in Native Son—he warns us against embracing one’s traumatization as a mode of negotiating the world. In foregoing what Sarah Schulman has recently called the “duty of repair,” such traumatized engagement prevents all search for the kind of “commonness” whose early articulation can be found in Aristotle’s query after “the common good” (to koinon agathon). With Baldwin, the present essay suggests the urgency of returning to the question of “the common good”: while mindful of past critiques, which have observed in this concept’s deployment a sleight-of-hand by which hegemonic positions universalize their interests, we should work to actualize the unfinished potential of Aristotle’s idea. Baldwin’s work on diasporic modernity provides an indispensable archive for this effort.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

). Since conflict can overwhelm state capacity for even basic service provision, planned incorporation of mental health into national and community level emergency preparedness, response and recovery systems is vital. Notably, DfID emphasises the need for strategic plans and programmes to promote the well-being of humanitarian staff – both local and international – often at high risk of suffering first-hand and/or secondary trauma. This requirement was conspicuously absent

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

discursive silences. The problem representation articulated by the IKEA partnership with JRF focuses on the insecure livelihoods experienced by Syrian women refugees and Jordanian women, while RefuSHE emphasises vulnerabilities and trauma arising from experiences of forced displacement and conflict. As solutions, the former integrates women in IKEA’s supply chain, while the latter combines education, healing and artisanal work. We conclude that despite differences, both problem

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

. Secondly (and equally importantly), while HEAT trainings ostensibly set out to mitigate potential trauma, they are themselves the cause of anxiety and trauma among aid workers – trauma that is often itself gendered. One interviewee described her own training as ‘run by a bunch of ex-marines who just loved terrorising the shit out of us’; others (including one of us) experienced nightmares in the lead-up and after their trainings. A further interviewee remarked that trainers

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

, Tony Redmond reflects on his long career as professor and practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of seeking innovation in medical humanitarianism but advocates to aim for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Valérie Gorin

wrong or right, or you can go from the ethical perspective (the ethos), the name-shame strategy, and then you go for papers. This is when visual content makes sense. Having held the position of a senior coordinator for attacks on healthcare, it’s very surreal to imagine that you’re getting bombed. And when you put somebody in a virtual reality situation, make him go through pretending to feel what’s happening, there’s a real emotional impact. They get it. Some people don’t. Some people may have some trauma triggered. So, especially if you recreate a trauma situation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

successfully applied all over the world. For example, the American Red Cross established fire-detection sensors in informal settlements in Nairobi ( American Red Cross, 2016 ) and Digital Democracy (2014) partnered with the Indigenous Wapichana people of Guyana to build and operate drones to monitor environmental degradation. UNICEF designed and delivered a crisis-response trauma programme to train Rwandese ‘trauma advisors’, ‘who in turn trained 6193

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

al. , 2017 ), even showing an increase after the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 2286 condemning those attacks ( UN, 2016 ). The violence that Syria’s health sector has experienced, especially in non-government-held areas, has had profound consequences. Hundreds of healthcare workers and patients have lost their lives, while the indirect effects in terms of trauma and loss of services continue to affect the population long after the attack has occurred ( Fouad

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs