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Open Access (free)
World Heritage and modernity
Author: Jes Wienberg

Heritopia explores the multiple meanings of the past in the present, using the famous temples of Abu Simbel and other World Heritage sites as points of departure. It employs three perspectives in its attempt to understand and explain both past and present the truth of knowledge, the beauties of narrative, and ethical demands. Crisis theories are rejected as nostalgic expressions of contemporary social criticism. Modernity is viewed as a collection of contradictory narratives and reinterpreted as a combination of technological progress and recently evolved ideas. The book argues that while heritage is expanding, it is not to be found everywhere, and its expansion does not constitute a problem. It investigates the World Heritage Convention as an innovation, demonstrating that the definition of a World Heritage site succeeds in creating a tenable category of outstanding and exclusive heritage. The book introduces the term “Heritopia” in order to conceptualise the utopian expectations associated with World Heritage. Finally, it points to the possibilities of using the past creatively when meeting present-day and future challenges.

The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

, Bertrand Taithe and John Borton have noted, often challenges the ‘memorial practices or established narratives’ ( Taithe and Borton, 2016 : 219) of humanitarian institutions, but those challenges must not necessarily come at the cost of humanitarian institutions. They may also pave the way for a reflected, critical use of the past that enables those institutions to harness the one resource they depend on – the trust of an educated public. Notes

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

mortuary space, to understand local leitmotifs as part of the expression of community history. Different agents working from different experiences within a unique and complex mortuary landscape created each funeral and, as a result, no two burials and no two cemeteries were the same. What this means is that any two persons’ experiences were not the same. This book shows that each site contained a number of different attitudes towards the body, the display of gender, the use of the past or the use of objects in mortuary display. As a result, the attitudes of a funerary

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

archaeology (Schnapp 1993 : 11). His critical title with military connotations, “The conquest of the past”, was, however, transformed in the English edition into a curiosity-driven adventure, The Discovery of the Past , and the question about the crime disappeared (Schnapp 1996 ). In the 1970s, two archaeologists initiated a wave of criticism of the use of the past and of heritage. Senake Bandaranayake published the article “Imperialism and Archaeology” (Bandaranayake 1974 ) under the pseudonym of “A. Gidtri”. Bandaranayake wrote that in order to be able to conquer

in Heritopia
Jes Wienberg

to the value of a long temporal perspective and to the specific advantages of exploring the material dimension. In both cases, the legitimation is indirectly related to the subject of history, to which a more limited perspective is ascribed, covering a relatively short period of time and wholly dependent on texts. Even in authoritative textbooks, the use of the past may be dealt with in a few lines under the heading “What use is the past?” – lines about the importance of feeling and knowing that there is a past, as well as about the importance of the past for

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

spite of the criticism, or has perhaps evolved because many people have failed to go beyond the books’ titles and lists of contents. Lowenthal views not only the past but also his own period as if he were a tourist on a visit to a “foreign country”. He takes a distanced view of the present’s use of the past as something strange, without wanting to understand, without useful explanations, and without constructive proposals for improvements. There are only small and scattered attempts to understand or explain why the past is protected, preserved, used, discovered

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

the existing society. According to this line of thought, society should not merely be described; it should be changed as well. Post-structuralism’s power-and-discourse criticism follows, with Michel Foucault as the central name. Finally, mention should be made of postcolonialism’s reckoning with a Western perspective on the world; one important work here is Edward Said’s book Orientalism ( 1978 ). Critical theory, poststructuralism, and postcolonialism come together in the critical study of the uses of the past and “the others” that emerged in the 1970s and 1980

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

an uneasy, hybrid set of relations. In its use of the past, indelibly marked by creative forgetting, Campbell suggests that Lone Star presents a radical, challenging revision of history and an optimistic, contested sense of the future for a multi-ethnic America. If ‘cultural memory is a field of cultural negotiation through which different stories vie for a place in history’, Part II explores the political stakes of

in Memory and popular film
The Show from street to print
Tracey Hill

with the 1616 Show, the originals of which are still in Fishmongers’ Hall, though in poor condition. These images, known as the Fishmongers’ Pageant Roll, mostly bear handwritten captions, written in the past tense. For instance, the picture of the ‘fishing busse’ is captioned ‘This bursse [sic] served on land and so did all the rest of the shewes following’.96 The use of the past tense might indicate a commemorative function for these images. More evidence for this supposition can be gleaned by the comment ‘This remaineth for an Ornament in Fishmongers Hall’ written

in Pageantry and power
Daniel Klerman

Klerman the past tense, even though it clearly happened at the eyre in open court. The record also indicates that William said that his father gave him the razor and tunic which had belonged to the deceased. Again, William probably spoke in court, although the use of the past tense might suggest otherwise. Because the defendant confessed, there is no verdict in this case. Nevertheless, it suggests that testimony was given in open court and that in appropriate cases such testimony could have provided evidence which influenced jury verdicts. As Maitland noted, there were

in Judicial tribunals in England and Europe, 1200–1700