Valérie Gorin

dilemmas raised by advocacy among MSF’s different sections. More recently, the use of virtual reality (VR) by aid agencies, including MSF, has questioned the paradigm of the humanitarian spectacle in the light of haptic sciences. Conversation Valérie Gorin (VG): MSF uses different terms to refer to advocacy, such as ‘ témoignage ’, ‘witnessing’, ‘speaking out’, ‘campaigning’. What does it say about the different interpretations of advocacy? Maria Guevara (MG): Advocacy is a complicated term, every organization has its own interpretation. Advocacy is a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

Introduction When looking at the history of visual humanitarianism, one surprisingly realizes that film history has only scarcely been covered, while scholarly interest has increased in humanitarian campaigns on digital media ( Cottle and Cooper, 2015 ). Yet, debates that emerged in the 1980s about the paradigm of distant suffering, immersion and chronotopic engagement by means of communication technologies, such as virtual reality, remain to be examined through historical patterns. In the age of mass communication, aid agencies turned very early to motion

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

G.M. Peter Swann

economies with dynamic increasing returns, the final outcome of an economic process is not like this state of grace: indeed, the character of the outcome is dependent on all the disturbances that have taken place along the line. Such thinking has started to permeate economic analysis of consumption. One particularly interesting development is the application of agent-based modelling to the analysis of consumption – especially waves in consumption, or ‘hits’. An intriguing prospect emerges from the convergence of virtual reality modelling and agent-based modelling of

in Innovation by demand
Barry Atkins

conclusions. Here was a form of fictional restraint: I could only tell the story in a particular way. There really was something here that demanded further thought. That the computer game has not, to date, received much serious critical attention as an independent form of fictional expression, rather than in passing as a technological curiosity or as a springboard for some extremely speculative theorising about the possibilities that might one day be revealed in virtual reality or cyberspace is hardly surprising, however. If this is a form of fiction, then it is still

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Pence

clear provocation is the emergence of a variety of alternative entertainment technologies offering a range of cognitive and somatic experiences which can best be described as postcinematic: the illusion of sensory immersion in virtual reality; the varieties of interactivity; multimedia and hypermedia. Cinema faces the crisis of becoming passé. The self-conscious and symptomatic response of cinema to its

in Memory and popular film
Globes, panoramas, fictions, and oceans
Peter Otto

circular painting has been hung. In this environment, spectators bring the panoramic illusion to life, as they half-perceive and half-create a hyper-realistic virtual reality ‘that extends in a complete circle around [them], to an imagined horizon (and then to an implied beyond)’. 3 This collocation of convincing illusion and amazing verisimilitude is why, as suggested by the titles of the two most important books on Australian panoramas – Canvas Documentaries (1998) by Mimi Colligan, and Capturing Time (2012) by Edwin Barnard – panorama paintings are routinely

in Worlding the south
The status of bodies in the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge genocide
Anne Yvonne Guillou

’une approche psychanalytique de groupe avec des réfugiés’, Revue Française de Psychanalyse, 75:4 (2011), pp. 1139–50. A. Y. Guillou, ‘The living archeology of a painful heritage: the first and second life of the Khmer Rouge mass graves’, in M. S. Falser & M. Juneja (eds), ‘Archaeologizing’ Heritage? Transcultural Entanglements Between Local Social Practices and Global Virtual Realities (Heidelberg: Springer, 2013), pp. 259–69. The ‘treasures’ include Angkorean and post-Angkorean statues that pepper Cambodia’s soil, Buddhist icons such as those found by Lady Penh in the

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Barry Atkins

are always in danger of prioritising ‘computer’ over ‘game’, ‘game’ over ‘fiction’, and making too many assumptions about the ‘virtual’ that do not take proper account of the ‘real’. The technological now that troubles Ballard as it appears to invert the traditional relations of author and text, real and imaginary, is also the focus of Jean Baudrilard’s short essay ‘Aesthetic Illusion and Virtual Reality’. In Baudrillard’s words: We don’t need digital gloves or a digital suit. As we are, we are moving around in a world as in a synthetic image. We have swallowed our

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Reading Half-Life
Barry Atkins

those limits, that is the major achievement of this as readable fiction. To place such emphasis on a possible distinction between ‘mimesis’ over ‘realism’ is not just a matter of logic-chopping or of semantics: as new forms of text and representation have emerged alongside the personal computer, so an accompanying language has entered common usage that is not always subject to clear definition, and the offhand and casual usage of ‘realism’ needs more careful consideration than has been currently recognised. In much the same way that the term ‘virtual reality’ does not

in More than a game