Learning from the case of Kosovo

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 69 4 Transforming a war economy: learning from the case of Kosovo AVING BUILT up a preliminary framework in the previous chapter through which war economies and transformation policies can be assessed, the case of Kosovo and transformation policies implemented by the DSI following the conflict there will be analysed, not simply to test the framework but to build and improve upon it. As a starting point, it is important to note that the conflict in Kosovo has primarily been analysed in relation to

in Building a peace economy?
Current policy options and issues

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 14 2 War economy transformation: current policy options and issues as a primary cause of a war, as one of several competing motivations to engage in violence, or simply an outcome of the supposed lawlessness that is characteristic of conflict, it is increasingly recognised that economic motivations create serious barriers to the resolution of war and the consolidation of peace. Not only a problem in terms of the causation, prolongation or intensity of conflict (Ballentine, 2003), these war

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 162 8 The war economy transformation agenda: DSI approaches and behaviours AR ECONOMIES are resilient to small-scale, narrowly defined projects, their transformation requiring concerted and simultaneous engagement by and through a variety of actors, reforms and processes. This range of programmes, broadly referred to in this book as the transformation agenda, has been developed and is implemented by a diverse network of actors, the Development-Security Industry (DSI) who work at multiple levels in

in Building a peace economy?
Liberal peacebuilding and the development-security industry

This book critically examines the range of policies and programmes that attempt to manage economic activity that contributes to political violence. Beginning with an overview of over a dozen policies aimed at transforming these activities into economic relationships which support peace, not war, the book then offers a sustained critique of the reasons for limited success in this policy field. The inability of the range of international actors involved in this policy area, the Development-Security Industry (DSI), to bring about more peaceful political-economic relationships is shown to be a result of liberal biases, resulting conceptual lenses and operational tendencies within this industry. A detailed case study of responses to organised crime in Kosovo offers an in-depth exploration of these problems, but also highlights opportunities for policy innovation. This book offers a new framework for understanding both the problem of economic activity that accompanies and sometimes facilitates violence and programmes aimed at managing these forms of economic activity. Summaries of key arguments and frameworks, found within each chapter, provide accessible templates for both students and aid practitioners seeking to understand war economies and policy reactions in a range of other contexts. It also offers insight into how to alter and improve policy responses in other cases. As such, the book is accessible to a range of readers, including students interested in peace, conflict and international development as well as policy makers and practitioners seeking new ways of understanding war economies and improving responses to them.

The nature of the development-security industry

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 43 3 Explaining the dynamics of transformation: the nature of the development-security industry AKING INTO account the common themes emerging from analyses of policies and agendas aimed at tackling the problem of war economies, it is clear that both the nature and outcomes of the transformation agenda are determined by a number of interdependent processes. These processes are determined by the interests and beliefs of powerful actors, in this case the network of actors that determine and implement

in Building a peace economy?
Managing the criminal facets of war economies

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 85 5 Strengthening the rule of law: managing the criminal facets of war economies IVEN THAT much of the activity surrounding war economies is considered to occur in the criminal realm, strengthening the rule of law (RoL) has come to be seen as central to the DSI’s transformation agenda. In theory, effective investigation, capture and prosecution of criminal actors will help to dismantle ongoing links between illegal economic activities and political violence. Building up the RoL may also act as a

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Protecting borders, confirming statehood and transforming economies?

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 138 7 Customs reform: protecting borders, confirming statehood and transforming economies? of commodities across national borders is a primary feature of conflict-related trade, customs services, tasked with monitoring the movement of goods and people across borders, emerge as central institutions in the transformation of war economies. Not only do they deal directly with the problem of smuggling in their work at border crossings, but they are also involved in the investigation and tracking of

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
War economies, peace economies and transformation

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 1 1 Introduction: war economies, peace economies and transformation Since the end of the Cold War, economic greed and profit-seeking have become a significant motivation for the perpetuation and deepening of conflict in some parts of the developing world. The most acute economic motivation in armed conflict has been the illicit exploitation of lucrative natural resources such as diamonds, timber, gold, oil, precious gems, and minerals like coltan, which have provided both the means and incentive

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 115 6 Privatisation: liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies related commodity governance schemes are meant to bring economic gains for individuals, groups and the state in a fair and neutral way, diminishing the possibility that economic resources will become a source of violent contestation. Ultimately, the transformation of war economies requires that assets, whether they be tangible (such as diamonds) or opportunities (in the form of business prospects), be transparently and

in Building a peace economy?
Core historical concepts reconsidered

political democracy – through the process of globalisation. The concentration of economic power within one nation-state, for example Berlusconi in Italy, can also undermine a democratic political culture. The debate on socialisation after the First World War The period following the First World War and the Russian, German and Austrian revolutions marked the first zenith of economic democracy. The M1738 - CALLAGHAN TEXT.indd 270 3/8/09 12:13:45 Economic democracy 271 reason for this was twofold. First, the institutions of the war economy had already established a

in In search of social democracy