Between “Stranger in the Village” and I Am Not Your Negro
Jovita dos Santos Pinto, Noémi Michel, Patricia Purtschert, Paola Bacchetta, and Vanessa Naef

James Baldwin’s writing, his persona, as well as his public speeches, interviews, and discussions are undergoing a renewed reception in the arts, in queer and critical race studies, and in queer of color movements. Directed by Raoul Peck, the film I Am Not Your Negro decisively contributed to the rekindled circulation of Baldwin across the Atlantic. Since 2017, screenings and commentaries on the highly acclaimed film have prompted discussions about the persistent yet variously racialized temporospatial formations of Europe and the U.S. Stemming from a roundtable that followed a screening in Zurich in February 2018, this collective essay wanders between the audio-visual and textual matter of the film and Baldwin’s essay “Stranger in the Village,” which was also adapted into a film-essay directed by Pierre Koralnik, staging Baldwin in the Swiss village of Leukerbad. Privileging Black feminist, postcolonial, and queer of color perspectives, we identify three sites of Baldwin’s transatlantic reverberations: situated knowledge, controlling images, and everyday sexual racism. In conclusion, we reflect on the implications of racialized, sexualized politics for today’s Black feminist, queer, and trans of color movements located in continental Europe—especially in Switzerland and France.

James Baldwin Review
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

International Development Studies ’, in de Jong , S. , Icaza , R. and Rutazibwa , O. U. (eds), Decolonization and Feminisms in Global Teaching and Learning ( London : Routledge ), pp. 192 – 214 . Sabaratnam , M. ( 2017 ), Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique ( London : Rowman & Littlefield International ). Wekker , G. ( 2016 ), White Innocence: Paradoxes of Colonialism and Race ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press ).

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

grooming available through Amazon.co.uk, all are covered with an image of a young white woman or girl. The bodied placement of the cover image is important: some are of very young girls who would be socially known as ‘children’, others rely on more heavily sexualised images of young women, often with skin exposed, wearing full make up, staring into the camera, often with doe-like blue eyes. Not a single cover references a woman of colour (we should remember that some things are not feelable in the same way; some things do not stick). This vision of white innocence is

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
White fragility and black social death
Ylva Habel

, virtue, peacefulness, and innocence. In her book White Innocence (2016: 18), Gloria Wekker argues that Dutch cultural and political discourse on white non-​racialised innocence is exceedingly strong. Exemplifying the aggressive ‘ignorance’ with which innocence is defended, she writes: ‘The behaviour and the speech acts of his [Zwarte Piet’s] defenders do not speak of innocence but rather of “an ignorance, militant, aggressive –​not … confined to the illiterate and uneducated but propagated at the highest levels of the land … presenting itself unblushingly as knowledge

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

(neo)colonialism and the questions of what continues to move people are completely erased. What I argue is manifest in the imagining of the ‘good’ migrant is in fact a re-scripting of colonial whiteness (also see Danewid 2017 for a comparative argument). It is the outward rejection of a xenophobicracist nationalism and the reformulation of a supposedly compassionate and humanitarian nationalism. But what haunts both accounts are appeals to white innocence (Wekker 2016). Compassionate nationalist accounts have particular traction on the liberal left in the UK – where

in Bordering intimacy
Catherine Baker

White Innocence , which builds on Said's reference to imperial fiction and poetry as a cultural archive via Ann Stoler's sense of the archive as a ‘repository of memory’ (Stoler 2009 : 49 in Wekker 2016 : 19) for everyday legacies of imperial rule in postcolonial metropoles. It is located in many things, in the way we think, do things, and look at the world, in what we find (sexually) attractive, in how our affective and rational economies are organized and intertwined. Most important, it is

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Catherine Baker

vocabulary of critical race scholars already exposing race in other parts of Europe outside the largest ex-metropoles – ‘white innocence’ (Wekker 2016 ); a mode of analogy, likening the marginalisation of part or all of the region through spatialised ‘Europe’–‘Balkan’ hierarchies to racialised marginalisations elsewhere; and a mode of connection, seeing identity-making projects within and projected on to the region as embedded within, not just parallel to, the global circulation and translation of ‘race’. To illustrate these modes, consider how each

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

expressions of ‘white innocence’ (Ross 1990 ) against which Wekker and Imre both write suggest that, in racial exceptionalism and attachment to whiteness, the two regions are not so far apart. They share, at least, a European family resemblance transcending the west/east divisions constructed before and during the Cold War; recognising race as a systemically global structure (Mills 2015 ) makes them not just in parallel but connected. Scholars of other eastern European countries and the USSR, not just the Yugoslav region, face

in Race and the Yugoslav region