Search results

The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Open Access (free)

democracy and citizenship away from those of Britain and towards those of North America. For many Canadians, the British Commonwealth itself is no longer important. Canadian identity is now located in Canadian space, with conquest, progress, modernization and the assimilation of all difference no longer considered unquestioned objectives. ‘White settler society’ now appears to be a limited descriptor, one

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

of metropole and colony in the first place’. 17 For such purposes, I look at the imposition of hegemony, not by the direct force of a colonizing power, but by the mimicry of descendants from the constructed British imperial centre. Hence, Canada as a ‘white settler society’ shapes my research. The process of European settlement in past empires is now problematized and un-settled. 18 Conquest

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

). 15 For detailed engagement with settler cultures as distinctively colonial, see D. Kennedy, Islands of White: Settler Society and Culture in Kenya and Southern Rhodesia, 1890–1939 (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1987). 16 See, for example, K. Malik, The Meaning of Race: Race, History and Culture in Western Society (Houndsmills

in Equal subjects, unequal rights

)). The frontier is also traditionally associated with violence. In this respect, Kingstown was no exception. Once it was established as the island’s foremost town, Kingstown became a place of security for members of white settler society and an important location where they sought protection against Garifuna fighters. Charles Shepherd describes one planter group embroiled in the Brigands’ War as being

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)

equated the suffering of Jews in Germany with blacks in the British colonies, especially those in the white settler societies. In an article which carried the title ‘The British empire is worst racket yet invented by man’ he indicted the British for exercising in southern Africa the ‘most blatant expression of racial superiority’, which produced for the blacks a situation ‘more tragic even than that of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain