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Cultural identity and change in the Atlantic archipelago

The concept of 'margins' denotes geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. This book aims to question the term 'marginal' itself, to hear the voices talking 'across' borders and not only to or through an English centre. The first part of the book examines debates on the political and poetic choice of language, drawing attention to significant differences between the Irish and Scottish strategies. It includes a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers. The book also explores masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorizing. A different perspective on the notion of marginality is offered by addressing 'Englishness' in relation to 'migrant' writing in prose concerned with India and England after Independence. The second part of the book focuses on a wide range of new poetry to question simplified margin/centre relations. It discusses a historicising perspective on the work of cultural studies and its responses to the relationship between ethnicity and second-generation Irish musicians from Sean Campbell. The comparison of contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction which identifies similarities and differences in recent developments is also considered. In each instance the writers take on the task of examining and assessing points of connection and diversity across a particular body of work, while moving away from contrasts which focus on an English 'norm'.

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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 187 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job 11 Beside the west: postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame Man’s history has to be built by the united effort of all the races in the world, and therefore this selling of conscience for political reasons – this making a fetish of one’s country, won’t do. I know that Europe does not at heart admit this, but there she has not the right to pose as our teacher. (Rabindranath Tagore, The Home and the World)1 Introduction: the postcolonial and the global

in Stories of women

   The articulation of beur female identity in the works of Farida Belghoul, Ferrudja Kessas and Soraya Nini In view of the relatively recent literary success of works by secondgeneration Maghrebis born and brought up in France and the self-designatory origins of the term beur,1 this chapter examines the work of three beur women writers in order to establish the extent to which the highly specific socio-historical locus of the beur writer, when combined with her female subject position, may produce narrative similarities, whether formal or

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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made visible than men’s. While the project of many contemporary women writers is to retrieve their bodies from public gaze, definition and consumption and to speak more directly and personally about their bodies and how they inhabit them, by writing, they also re-enter the public realm. The transposition of our private and personal selves into the public sphere is, as has been shown in this volume, a risky endeavour. Part of the reason why Christine Angot’s work is so controversial is because she puts into writing the intimate feelings, secret and unacceptable

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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particularly dynamic moment for contemporary French women’s writing. On the other hand, we are looking forward into the twenty-first century, to the next decades, as we chart the ways in which contemporary women writers are themselves in the process of shaping wider literary debates. In all these ways and in its specific focus on writing by women in s metropolitan France, Women’s Writing in Contemporary France marks out its difference from existing volumes on French women’s writing.3 Historical context The second half of the twentieth century was a period of substantial

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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Defining the nation differently

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 207 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job 12 Conclusion: defining the nation differently In some notable instances, as has been seen, women writers work to transform the male lineaments of the postcolonial nation. In others, they attempt merely to decipher and to modify its structures of privilege. Although the topics and texts discussed in this book have varied widely, the foregoing chapters have been linked by their shared concern with the strategies used by novel writers, women but also men, to recast the

in Stories of women
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The adolescent girl and the nation

or secondary national ‘mother’, a subsidiary figurehead.2 Postcolonial women writers have, however, confronted the symbolic inheritance that is the peripheral figure of the postcolonial national daughter, whether child or adolescent, either as a part of, or in addition to, adopting the writerly resistance strategies outlined in the previous chapter. Their engagement with women’s national identity therefore emerges not only in the mani- BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 107 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job The adolescent girl and the nation

in Stories of women
Wharton,Woolf and the nature of Modernism

Modernism written during the 1960s, however, feature male experimenters, ignoring female contributions on either side of the divide. Feminist scholars in the 1980s and 1990s grappled with the term Modernism, seeking ways of expanding our understanding of how women writers may have participated in the male-defined literary movement. Most have come to see Edith Wharton as a transitional figure on a literary journey from the traditional novel forms of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries toward the supposedly braver, bolder experimental Modernist forms of the twentieth

in Special relationships
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic

assessment of the Female Gothic identifies a combination of personal, psychological, social and economic anxieties expressed through the heroines’ fears of malevolent parents and locates these fears as the genre’s ‘originating fantasy’. 54 Scholars such as Eugenia C. DeLamotte and Ellis likewise read incest portrayals as representative of the distinctly unique experience of women and women writers in the

in Gothic incest
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Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy

emerging out of the juxtaposition of the 1890s and 1990s moments of reception of these two Indian women writers is that certain critical elements have resonated down the century, from the time of the acclaim for Naidu to the present day.21 Most prominent among these elements is the conflation of biography, female body and writing, which characterises the terms through which the works of both Naidu and Roy are perceived. Noteworthy, though not always typical, is also the singling out of a slight, feminine body shape as somehow corresponding to stylistic whimsicality, or

in Stories of women