continuity, innovation and renewal
Paul Kennedy

5 The Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party: continuity, innovation and renewal Paul Kennedy The Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español – PSOE) was founded in Madrid in 1879. It was the largest party on the left during the Second Republic (1931–36), and provided the Republic with two prime ministers during the Spanish Civil War, Francisco Largo Caballero (1936–37) and Juan Negrín (1937–39). Brutally repressed by the Franco regime (1939–75), the PSOE almost disappeared as a significant political force within Spain. Nevertheless, under the

in In search of social democracy
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2 2 1 1 Editorial Editor’s Introduction Espada Fernando F.Espada@savethechildren.org.uk 01 01 2020 21 9 2020 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 28 10.7227/JHA.028 Research Article Civil–Military Coordination A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response Bollettino Vincenzo vbollett@hsph.harvard.edu Anders Birthe bianders@hsph.harvard.edu 01 01 2020 21 9 2020 2 2 1 1 3 3 10 10 29 10.7227/JHA.029 Confronting Humanitarian Insecurity The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers Brooks Julia julia

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Abductions of Aid Workers Weissman Fabrice fabrice.weissman@paris.msf.org 01 05 2019 19 08 2019 1 1 2 2 38 38 42 42 16 10.7227/JHA.016 Oases of Humanity and the Realities of War Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles Brauman Rony

Fabrice Weissman

Introduction Every year, dozens of national and international aid workers are kidnapped. Like governments and companies, most humanitarian organisations handle these events with the utmost secrecy. While Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), for example, publicly confirmed the abduction and release of staff members kidnapped in Kenya in 2011 and Syria in 2014, 1 the organisation made no effort to mobilise public opinion as a way to gain their

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

extent to which the differences are justified. The aim is not to argue for or against particular strategies for the safety of aid workers or the wider civilian population, or even to argue that the distinction between these two fields of practice should be removed, but rather to highlight and problematise this distinction, which is usually taken for granted. Concerns about physical violence and safety are by no means new to international humanitarian agencies

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
David Rieff

codes is ultimately voluntary. It remains the case that with sufficient funding any group of people could call itself a relief organisation. Such a group might not be allowed to participate in operations coordinated by the UN, but that is by no means all operations. The humanitarian field remains wide open to any and all who wish to engage in it. In any case, the idea that humanitarian work can be apolitical is complete nonsense. While many, though not all, relief workers have come from and identified with the Left as citizens , relief

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

Introduction ‘ I remember [years ago] being in a refugee camp in Syria, and when there were demonstrations and people picked up sticks and were throwing stones, and we were like, ‘Alright, that’s it, we’re withdrawing until they settle down.’ We withdrew for two days until they came and apologised and then we went back in again. Sticks and stones are a piece of cake compared to what we face now. ’ 1 Relayed by a humanitarian worker interviewed for this article, the quote paints a vivid portrait of the way that many humanitarians view the shifting nature

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

( UN, 2016 ). The violence that Syria’s health sector has experienced, especially in non-government-held areas, has had profound consequences. Hundreds of healthcare workers and patients have lost their lives, while the indirect effects in terms of trauma and loss of services continue to affect the population long after the attack has occurred ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ). Important insights have been gained in the prevalence of attacks on healthcare ( PHR, 2019a ; 2019b ), the measuring of such attacks ( Elamein et al. , 2017 ; Briody et al. , 2018 ; Haar et al

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

Cold War, which is endangering both humanitarian teams and the operations they conduct. References to ‘before’ have been heard since the mid-1990s, in the wake of the Bosnian War and the Tutsi genocide. The mass killings in Bosnia and Rwanda – coming on the heels of the Somali and Liberian civil wars – created a landscape of widespread violence, ‘anarchic conflicts’ in which not even humanitarian workers or journalists were safe. People stressed the contrast with earlier

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

-state actors towards innocent civilians is increasing, along with deliberate targeting of humanitarian workers, operations and inventory used to help people trapped in conflict ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2018 ). Amplifying this instability has been the slow progress towards changing the vulnerability of people living in many countries. Notwithstanding advances made in Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets, an estimated 736

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs