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Nineteenth-century literary culture and the southern settler colonies

This collection brings together for the first time literary studies of British colonies in nineteenth-century Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Drawing on hemispheric studies, Indigenous studies, and southern theory to decentre British and other European metropoles, the collection offers a latitudinal challenge to national paradigms and traditional literary periodisations and canons by proposing a new literary history of the region that is predicated less on metropolitan turning points and more on southern cultural perspectives in multiple regional centres from Cape Town to Dunedin. With a focus on southern orientations, southern audiences, and southern modes of addressivity, Worlding the south foregrounds marginal, minor, and neglected writers and texts across a hemispheric complex of southern oceans and terrains. Drawing on an ontological tradition that tests the dominance of networked theories of globalisation, the collection also asks how we can better understand the dialectical relationship between the ‘real’ world in which a literary text or art object exists and the symbolic or conceptual world it shows or creates. By examining the literary processes of ‘worlding’, it demonstrates how art objects make legible homogenising imperial and colonial narratives, inequalities of linguistic power, textual and material violence, and literary and cultural resistance. With contributions from leading scholars in nineteenth-century literary and cultural studies, the collection revises literary histories of the ‘British world’ by arguing for the distinctiveness of settler colonialism in the southern hemisphere, and by incorporating Indigenous, diasporic, settler, and other southern perspectives.

Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

such enabling, form-giving forms, especially where they become officially sanctioned and embedded, has the effect of disrupting, at times profitably, the coercive common destiny or shared cultural tradition that is invoked. Perhaps the most influential, though also the most contested-against advocate of narrative as a ‘process of [national] form-giving’, of writing plot into history, is Fredric Jameson, in particular as he expresses his ideas in the widely cited, controversial essay ‘Third-world literature in the era of multinational capitalism’.32 Although Jameson is one

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Southern worlds, globes, and spheres
Sarah Comyn and Porscha Fermanis

this knowledge implies, one way or the other – so as to aggregate cultural production, to describe its poiēsis and agents, and to frame its reading?’ 54 Our proposal is not a rejection of the insights enabled by the methodologies of critical global thinking, world-systems theory, and/or world literature, but rather their fusion with a more explicit focus on the ontological dimensions of worlding so as to better appreciate the world-making capabilities of aesthetic objects. 55 To ignore the temporal and spatial constructions of a text’s own world and its

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Antipodean life as a comparative exercise
Sarah Comyn

rejects it as myth. 16 In considering what she describes as the ‘embodiments of Australia in world literature’, Vilashini Cooppan lingers on the figure of the ‘antipodean foot’ (which she terms a ‘species of continental fetishism’) best represented in the Osma Beatus map of 1086 ( Figure 2.1 ), where the mythological figure of a Skiapod shields itself from the red-hot southern sun. 17 ‘A proxy substitute’ for the southern continent, the antipodean foot evokes a corporeal inversion that promotes ‘displacement and disavowal’: ‘the order of the austral map’ is ‘that it

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Birgit Lang, Joy Damousi, and Alison Lewis

empirical world, as well as the worlds of fiction and make-believe, literature came almost entirely unstuck. Joe Cleary has contended that the collapse of the European imperial world brought about the collapse of the Anglo-French literary world system. Until the First World War, Paris and London were the un­ contested centres of world literature; bourgeois realism and the advent of the novel were considered the supreme achievements of world literature. According to this view, the ‘breakup of the old London- and Paris-centred literary world-system’ sparked a concomitant

in A history of the case study
Louis James

World literatures for schoolteachers, lobbied for such texts to be accepted by British Schools Examination Boards, and published the journal Wasafiri , which still continues. In the Caribbean, Kenneth Ramchand and Gordon Rohlehr, both CAM activists, introduced Caribbean literature into the UWI syllabuses at Mona and St Augustine, Trinidad, and encouraged its teaching in local secondary schools. In

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

a immense cosmopolitan awareness of world literature, as well as being a groundbreaking aesthetic thinker, could be seen as part of a problematic tradition, is indefensible. The real question, of course, as I suggested above, is which tradition of aesthetics is at issue.21 One answer to the question of how the traditions of aesthetics are often conceived is the (questionable) philosophical story common to Heidegger, Gadamer, Derrida, Lyotard, in some respects Adorno, and others. In this story modernity is seen as dependent on the idea that the ‘certainty of all

in The new aestheticism
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

the practical actors and authors of African life, males are the more normatively human. If we are to believe Aijaz Ahmad’s persuasive case concerning the canonisation of writing preoccupied with national experience as ‘Third Worldliterature, Salman Rushdie is the definitive ‘Third World’ writer, not least because he is at the same time a leading proponent of postmodernist narrative form.11 Rushdie himself repeatedly dramatises and literalises the understanding which forms the point of critical focus of this book: that ‘legends make reality’, ‘homelands’ are for a

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

’s Butterfly Burning’, and Emmanuel Chiwome, ‘A comparative analysis of Solomon Mutswairo and Yvonne Vera’, in Robert Muponde and Mandi Taruvinga (eds), Sign and Taboo: Perspectives on the Poetic Fiction of Yvonne Vera (Harare: Weaver Press, 2002), pp. 108 and 179–90, respectively. Fredric Jameson, ‘Third-World literature in the era of multinational capitalism’, Social Text, 15 (1986), 65–88. Gillian Rose, Feminism and Cultural Geography: The Limits of Geographical Knowledge (Oxford: Polity Press, 1993). Rosemary M. George, The Politics of Home: Postcolonial Relocations and

in Stories of women
De-scribing Imperial identity from alien to migrant
Peter Childs

publishing houses of London from 1981 onwards. The journey is itself not only temporal, but one of millions of postcolonial migrants world-wide, and of the concept of national identity itself, from Anant’s England of ‘Alienation’ to Rushdie’s ‘world of migrants’. Notes 1 Brennan is of course indebted to Fredric Jameson’s point in his controversial essay on ‘third world literature’ (1986) to which Aijaz Ahmad (1987) took such exception. 2 ‘Gora’ was a word applied to the British tommies and means ‘whitey’. The Hobson-Jobson dictionary says it applies to any European who is

in Across the margins