Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings and Lauren Harris

organisations to absorb the administrative duties of sanctions applications was a concern to several interviewees. One example of an administrative hurdle came from an interviewee who was applying for an exemption from her home country of Australia. One of her Korean contacts named on the application had a similar – though not identical – name to that of an individual sanctioned by the UN. The system flagged this, and the interviewee needed to prove that her contact was not the person under sanctions. She was able to do so by obtaining a passport scan from her partner

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, 28 , 998 , doi: 10.1353/hrq.2006.0039 . ACFID ( 2016 ), Innovation for Impact: How Australian NGOs Nurture and Scale Up New Ideas ( Deakin : Australian Council for International Development ). Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) ( 2018 ), Standards for Older People and People with Disabilities: Age and Disability Consortium ( London

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

that have separate lines of funding for humanitarian and development activity may consider the Australian Aid ‘early recovery’ or the Canadian ‘whole-of-government’ or ‘whole-of-department’ approaches as potential ways of working, or using the ‘resilience’ framework to enable programmatic flexibility across humanitarian and development funding lines ( FAO, 2016 ; GoC, 2017 ; IAHE, 2015 ; Jeene et al. , 2013 ; Morrison-Métois, 2017 ; OCHA, 2015 ). To-date, this flexibility has been widely recognised as being required, but insufficiently acted upon. The Norwegian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

. Sandvik , K. B. ( 2018 ), ‘ Technology, Dead Male Bodies, and Feminist Recognition: Gendering ICT Harm Theory’ , Australian Feminist Law Journal , 44 : 1 , 49 – 69 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2019 ), ‘ Technologizing the Fight against Sexual Violence: A Critical Scoping’, PRIO Paper (Oslo: PRIO) , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

practice has also been reported in some countries in South America (Colombia), and in Asia, Malaysia, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. It is performed in immigrant communities in Europe, Australia and North America. It was reported that in the UK, between October and December 2016, 2,332 attendances at NHS trusts and GP practices were reported where FGM was identified or a procedure for FGM was undertaken.206 In the world, 200 million women and girls in 30 countries have undergone the procedure, of which 44 million are girls below 14. The origins of the

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Privacy, liability and interception
Christopher T. Marsden

by the whistle-blower Edward Snowden and The Guardian newspaper in June to October 2013. 18 ‘Five Eyes’ (or more formally AUSCANNZUKUS) describes the cooperation between the intelligence (i.e. espionage) agencies of the Anglo-Saxon powers during what in English-speaking countries was called the Cold War between the US/allies and the Warsaw Pact/allies. 19 The United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New

in Network neutrality
Towards Specialised Services?
Christopher T. Marsden

Mbps broadband for all households on non-discriminatory terms by 2012, a minimum QoS guarantee backed by law, making it the world’s first country to offer such minimal neutrality. Other countries may soon follow, and Australia is building a wholesale fibre-to-the-node network, supplemented by rural satellite, which will offer a much higher speed universal service, though conditions of retail access

in Network neutrality
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

the international human rights regime accommodate non-State actors?’, in P. Alston (ed.), Non-State Actors and Human Rights (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005) 3, p. 4. 35 Pisillo Mazzeschi, ‘Responsabilité de l’état’, p. 187. 36 A. Byrnes, ‘Women, feminism and international human rights law – methodological myopia, fundamental flaws or meaningful marginalisation? Some current issues’, Australian Year Book of International Law 12 (1992) 205, p. 227. 37 See ‘The obligation to respect, to protect and to fulfil human rights, and the meaning of core

in Violence against women’s health in international law