Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45

During the Depression and the Second World War the IODE’s vision for Canada was influenced by Britain’s weakening position in relation to a strengthening Canada. Although the influence of investments and popular culture from the USA was increasing at that time, British immigrants were still valued as superior to those of other races and the IODE promoted its own version of

in Female imperialism and national identity

24 Aboriginal transitions research project in British Columbia, Canada Sarah Cormode Context The project was initiated by the University of Victoria, Office of CommunityBased Research (OCBR), the University of Victoria – Office of Indigenous Affairs (INAF) and Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association (IAHLA), who jointly responded to a call for proposals issued by the provincial government for research projects considering various ‘transition’ experiences of students on the journey to post-secondary education. The three partners proposed to jointly

in Knowledge, democracy and action

political issue, which runs the risk of raising the stakes. On the other hand, by endowing the hostages with greater commercial and political value, mobilisation campaigns may serve to protect their lives and pressure those with the power to facilitate their release. British journalists have noted that the lack of information and public advocacy on behalf of aid workers David Haines and Allan Henning, who were abducted in Syria by the Islamic State (IS) in 2014, did not prevent their execution. On the contrary, the silence of their organisation and the media may have

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Indigenous people in British settler colonies, 1830s–1910

This book focuses on the ways in which the British settler colonies of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa treated indigenous peoples in relation to political rights, commencing with the imperial policies of the 1830s and ending with the national political settlements in place by 1910. Drawing on a wide range of sources, its comparative approach provides an insight into the historical foundations of present-day controversies in these settler societies.

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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

.1 Itinerary of the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour of Canada Each of the parties involved in organizing the tour, from the IODE and the SOSBW to the Canadian and British Governments, had its own particular great hope for the tour. Such enthusiasm on an imperial and a national scale contrasted with the media attention. A wide selection of

in Female imperialism and national identity
Defending Cold War Canada

she, herself, joins’. On top of that advice it would be useful to teach children ‘pride in and loyalty to the traditions of democracy of the British Empire and their application to Canadian life today’. 1 Such advice illuminates the importance of women to postwar Canadian citizenship. Citizenship was a place that was gendered through an appeal to women’s enduring domestic positioning. While

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

the IODE in historical context, revealing its substantial contribution in the making of an Anglo-Canadian identity in the image of Britain. At a first glance the IODE appears as one of the many women’s philanthropic organizations that emerged from the second part of the nineteenth century onwards. With an increase in the status given to what was deemed women’s ‘natural’ work of

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples

the Cold War, to a group of citizens who, although living within Canadian territory, were previously considered ‘foreign’. This shift represented the change in Canada’s identity from that of a dominion in the Empire, with an identity centred on Britain, to that of a nation situated in Canadian geographic space. The decreasing confidence in colonial attitudes was reflected in the drifting away of the

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’

adoption in Canada is a question which you have better means of determining than I possess.’ 3 By 1840 there were four colonies in mainland British North America, clustered in the south-eastern corner of the vast Canadian land mass, the rest of which remained under the administration of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Representative government had been introduced during the last quarter of the eighteenth century

in Equal subjects, unequal rights