Patrick Callaghan and Penny Bee

Quantitative Data Analysis Patrick Callaghan and Penny Bee Chapter overview Quantitative data analysis makes sense of numerical data. We often refer to quantitative data analysis as statistical analysis, and you may see this term used in published research papers. We can use numbers to summarise the experiences or characteristics of a group of participants, for example their average age or the number of symptoms they report. We can also use numbers to look at people’s behaviours, experiences and views, for example the number of people using mental health

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers

Chapter 8: Introduction to Qualitative Data Analysis Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers Chapter overview Qualitative data includes a range of textual (e.g. transcripts of interviews and focus groups) and visual (photographic and video) data. During qualitative analysis researchers make sense of this data gathered from research. Analysing the data by looking for common themes (known as thematic analysis) is one of the most common ways in which to do this and involves examining and recording patterns within the data relating to a specific research question

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

, and increasing data and private-sector involvement in humanitarian aid. 3 I want to focus on how these developments, the miniaturisation and personalisation of ICT technology and a growing interface with biotechnology are co-producing what I call ‘intimate humanitarian objects’ for use by individual beneficiaries on or inside their bodies ( Jasanoff, 2004 ). The object of my analysis is the making of ‘humanitarian wearables’. 4 These are conceptualised as smart devices that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

communities in crisis in the future. Scott-Smith’s paper shifts attention to humanitarian architecture, arguing that the humanitarian sector often relies on an uncritical technophilia, which fetishises objects rather than focusing on politics and process. Using shelter as his site of analysis, he suggests that ‘buildings without architecture’ are bound to fall short of the socio-spatial challenges of producing appropriate, diverse and affordable shelter. Illustrated through the Viennese projects Places for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

spirit of 1970s direct humanitarian action was fabricated from a deductive process of knowledge formation framed by narratives of history, causation and reciprocity. Reflecting the rise to dominance of a cybernetic episteme, this register has been replaced by a reliance on inductive mathematical data and machine-thinking for sense-making ( Rouvroy, 2012 ). Thinking has been transformed into calculation ( Han, 2013 ). 1 The current dominance within the academy of empiricism and behaviourism reflects this change in world-experience. What is often

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

with the requisite language skills are less likely to be available. Technological solutions are also less feasible. For example, MT generally relies upon the availability of already translated digitised texts to train each system. The Creole-to-English MT system in Haiti was only possible because of previously translated texts (though limited in number), including the Bible and data from a Carnegie Mellon University speech-to-speech research project conducted in the 1990s

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

-affected communities ( Bloom and Betts, 2013 ; Jacobsen, 2015 ; Ong and Combinido, 2018 ). In addition, because much humanitarian innovation merely repurposes commercial innovation for humanitarian use ( Carbonnier, 2015 ), when humanitarian actors incorporate these technologies into their work they also incorporate the values embedded in them. In the specific case of information technologies, this creates ‘a political economy in which technocratic solutions and quantitative data are more highly valued

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

differences between staff security and civilian protection do not seem to be driven by beliefs about differential levels of threat. Analysis of the data on attacks on aid workers mostly focuses on trends in the absolute numbers of attacks, comparing them across time and across country operating contexts. 3 To the extent that comparisons are made based on estimates of the rates of attacks on aid workers, these comparisons are with on-the-job death rates in hazardous

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

masquerade as news reports. Attempting to add clarity to the debate, journalism commentator and researcher Claire Wardle (2017) suggests that we should distinguish between different types of fake news, paying attention to: 1) the nature and type of the content, 2) the motivation of the producer and 3) how it is disseminated. From this analysis, Wardle suggests there is a spectrum of fake news: at one end is satire and parody – content that has no intention to cause harm but can potentially fool audiences; in the middle there is content that is taken

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs