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Vaccinating Britain

Mass vaccination and the public since the Second World War

Series:

Gareth Millward

Vaccinating Britain investigates the relationship between the British public and vaccination policy since 1945. It is the first book to examine British vaccination policy across the post-war period and covers a range of vaccines, providing valuable context and insight for those interested in historical or present-day public health policy debates. Drawing on government documents, newspapers, internet archives and medical texts it shows how the modern vaccination system became established and how the public played a key role in its formation. British parents came to accept vaccination as a safe, effective and cost-efficient preventative measure. But occasional crises showed that faith in the system was tied to contemporary concerns about the medical profession, the power of the state and attitudes to individual vaccines. Thus, at times the British public demanded more comprehensive vaccination coverage from the welfare state; at others they eschewed specific vaccines that they thought were dangerous or unnecessary. Moreover, they did not always act uniformly, with “the public” capable of expressing contradictory demands that were often at odds with official policy. This case study of Britain’s vaccination system provides insight into the relationship between the British public and the welfare state, as well as contributing to the historiography of public health and medicine.

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Invisible men

The historian and the male witch

Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

Between roughly 1450 and 1750, secular, Inquisitorial, and ecclesiastical courts across continental Europe,the British Isles,and the American colonies tried approximately 110,000 people for the crime of witchcraft, executing around 60,000. 1 All historiography dealing with early modern witchcraft is concerned,on some level,with explaining why this happened. There is no shortage of interpretations: the last thirty years

Open Access (free)

Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

common subjects in witchcraft historiography. Specialists in early modern witchcraft are aware that it was not sex-specific,even among the most misogynist demonologists.Modern scholars of various ideological and methodological leanings have excluded male witches from witchcraft historiography by either ignoring or ‘declassifying’ them. This exclusion betrays the unreflexive nature of much witchcraft historiography,in which

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Series:

Heloise Brown

conclusion Conclusion Within the historiography of pacifist feminism, there has been a general reluctance to look further back than the First World War. The wide range of literature on the Victorian women’s movement which has been produced over the last twenty years has either neglected the fact that many feminists were active in campaigns for international peace, or has listed ‘peace’ as a women’s issue during the late nineteenth century without offering any further analysis of how women were involved, or what they did in this connection.1 The obvious exception

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Series:

Susan M. Johns

poetic fields.2 Elisabeth van Houts confirmed the importance of female patrons of historiography, and their role as repositories of family history and in the instruction of their sons, and more importantly their central role in the creation of social memory.3 Susan Groag Bell traced a tradition whereby medieval noblewomen were important as cultural ambassadors and in the literary education of their daughters.4 The importance of female patronage in providing distinctive, innovative forms of literature is an important element in Lois Huneycutt’s reassessment of the

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Remembering the Japanese occupation massacres

Mass graves in post-war Malaysia

Series:

Frances Tay

harnessed to fashion a mutually cohesive narrative. Rather, ‘sectional narratives’ predicated upon these varied communal experiences have emerged.5 This divergence in experience resulted from the occupiers’ practice of race-specific policies, where the Chinese community in particular bore the brunt of Japanese aggression.6 In contrast, Japanese occupation policy was relatively supportive of the Malays and encouraging towards the Indians.7 The lack of an inclusive past is exacerbated by the continued marginalization of minority histories from official historiography of the

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George Campbell Gosling

phenomenon. After surveying some key themes in the historiography of healthcare in early twentieth-century Britain, this chapter will turn to a few enlightening international comparisons. Previous international perspectives on hospital funding have tended to focus on health insurance, which allows for some revealing comparisons. For example, under the National Health Insurance scheme British doctors were paid according to a rather ungenerous

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Marie Lennersand and Linda Oja

proceedings. There was usually a long history of related events following a trial as well as leading up to it. In this context it is important to question both the ways in which local society affected a witch-hunt and how the witch-hunt altered the lives of everybody involved. In the historiography of witchcraft it has been recognised that the background and the relationships between the involved parties in a witchhunt were determining factors for how things would turn out. Even if accuser and accused had not been involved in face-to-face conflicts before the accusations

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The caring nation

Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves as a reparative fantasy

Anu Koivunen

general public is offered an opportunity to look back to see and acknowledge the lives and losses that passed unmarked thirty years earlier. As a testimonial space, fiction thus enabled a re-​enactment of the original trauma, functioning as a mode of affective historiography (Koivunen, 2016) and foregrounding felt connection and a sensory dimension of conceptualising the past. Feelings of fear, anger, and grief were reframed as a concern for a national collective, and indeed both social media and other public commentaries celebrated the television drama for ‘tearful

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Series:

Susan M. Johns

gatherings of individuals at specific occasions. The date of composition within a wider chronology of change in the twelfth century is also significant, since the Angevin legal reforms may have had an impact upon the way that charters were drawn up. The significance of witnessing and the procedures for recording an act changed during the twelfth century, and charter formulas reflect those changes.16 Everything indicates considerable variation in the construction of witness lists. The historiography of witnessing turns on two axes within broader debates about the nature of