Search results

Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

vulnerability rather than context-specific vulnerability analysis, and that national staff are frequently offered lesser protections than expatriate staff, even where they face greater risks ( Carpenter, 2003 ; Dolan and Hovil, 2006 ; Stoddard et al. , 2011 ). Furthermore, a 2011 UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) report on ‘good practice for humanitarians in complex security environments’ acknowledges that local civilians ‘suffer most from conflict and violence’ and makes the case for aid-worker security measures not in terms of differential

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

). Betts , A. and Bloom , L . ( 2014 ), ‘ Humanitarian Innovation: The State of the Art ’, in OCHA Policy and Studies Series ( New York : United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs ). Boltanski , L. and Chiapello , E . ( 2005 ), The New Spirit of Capitalism ( London and New York : Verso . Original edition , 1999 ). BOND ( 2003 ), Joint statement by members of the International Global Security and Development Network on the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), ‘A

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

one problem: the video wasn’t real. It was the creation of 34-year-old director Lars Klevberg, and it was filmed in Malta with child actors, using a set from the movie Gladiator . Klevberg said he wanted the video to start a conversation about the impact of war on children. Critics said he had gone too far: that the video created confusion and cynicism, which undermined attempts to address conflict in Syria ( Salyer, 2014 ). ‘Syrian hero boy’ was not an isolated incident. When audiences look online for information about humanitarian crises, they

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

would create such abject living conditions (akin to Agamben’s ‘bare life’: Gordon, 2018 ) that Palestinians would be forced to accept what Trump and his administration have denominated the ‘deal of the century’ ( Gordon, 2018 ; Wong, 2018 ). Far from being motivated by an ‘ethics of care’ to protect displaced and dispossessed people, or a quest to secure a democratically grounded ‘liberal peace’, this ‘great deal’ can be identified as a quintessentially neoliberal project. Driven neither by ethics nor humanitarian principles, this is an

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

produce substantiated accounts of incidents in specific contexts are still rare. Often methodologically wanting and more normative than analytical in their approach, as Fabrice Weissman has shown ( Weissman, 2016 ), these quantitative studies offer little interpretation of violent incidents other than to say that they demonstrate a lack of respect for international humanitarian norms that require belligerents to protect and facilitate the provision of healthcare to the sick and wounded. They tend to reinforce the assumption, widely held among the aid community, that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From model to symbol

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the European Union (EU) stands out as an important regional organization. This book focuses on the influence of the World Bank on the EU development cooperation policy, with special emphasis on the Lomé Convention. It explains the influence of trade liberalisation on EU trade preferences and provides a comparative analysis of the content and direction of the policies developed towards the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP), the Mediterranean, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe. It looks at the trade-related directorates and their contribution to the phenomenon referred as 'trade liberalisation'. This includes trends towards the removal or elimination of trade preferences and the ideology underlying this reflected in and created by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/World Trade Organisation (GATT/WTO). The book examines the role of the mass media because the media are supposed to play a unique role in encouraging political reactions to humanitarian emergencies. The bolting on to development 'policy' of other continents, and the separate existence of a badly run Humanitarian Office (ECHO), brought the lie to the Maastricht Treaty telling us that the EU really had a coherent development policy. The Third World in general, and Africa in particular, are becoming important components in the EU's efforts to develop into a significant international player. The Cotonou Agreement proposes to end the preferential trade margins accorded to non-least developed ACP states in favour of more liberal free trade agreements strongly shaped by the WTO agenda.

Bureaucratic politics in EU aid – from the Lomé leap forward to the difficulties of adapting to the twenty-first century

itself became an increasing embarrassment and slowly slid down the scale of Commission priorities. The bolting on to development ‘policy’ of other continents, and the separate existence of a badly run Humanitarian Office (ECHO), brought the lie to the Maastricht Treaty telling us that the EU really had a coherent development policy. Much has been devoted to burying Lomé without appearing to do so. By Lomé IV in 1990 it was arguably brain-dead, if a Convention can so be. Yet it was renewed for a further ambitious ten years, and not five as before. Cotonou capped that in

in EU development cooperation
Security and complex political emergencies instead of development

social and economic development in Africa, which has been perceived as a particularly difficult case (Riddel, 1999; Walle, 1999; Thérien and Lloyd, 2000). European humanitarian assistance to Africa in the 1990s The end of the Cold War, and especially the frustration over the lack of a European capability to deliver efficient humanitarian assistance during and after the crisis following the war liberating Kuwait in 1991, led to initiatives to establish an EC office with special responsibility for humanitarian assistance. The organisation became known under the name of

in EU development cooperation
Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism

The mass media is a critical actor in the global humanitarian system. New communication technologies have publicised and drawn attention to disasters and faraway suffering, collapsing the distance between global North and South, mobilising public empathy and accelerating the growth of international NGOs. 1 The linkages between humanitarianism and the media have been analysed from a range of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
The Marshall Plan films about Greece

A growing number of studies have argued for a historical and historicised understanding of global humanitarianism and humanitarian intervention. 1 However, the history of the interdependence of humanitarianism with media campaigns and the wider visual culture of each period remains an underexplored field, as the few studies in this area highlight. 2 The Marshall Plan films stand for a landmark

in Global humanitarianism and media culture